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Medical marijuana uses – 700 medical marijuana clinical studies and papers

  • September 26, 2012 4:09 pm

700 uses of Medical Marijuana | Sorted by Disease | ADD – Wilson’s Disease | Links to 700 Clinical Studies | Medical Marijuana Reference | Cannabis as Medicine

Medical marijuana and cannabis studies A collection of clinical studies, papers and reference providing the ultimate resource for medical disorders helped by medical marijuana.

 

 

ADD/ ADHD
Marijuana and ADD Therapeutic uses of Medical Marijuana in the treatment of ADD
http://www.onlinepot.org/medical/add&mmj.htm

Cannabis as a medical treatment for attention deficit disorder
http://www.chanvre-info.ch/info/en/…-treatment.html

Cannabinoids effective in animal model of hyperactivity disorder
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=162#4

Cannabis ‘Scrips to Calm Kids?
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,117541,00.html

Addiction risk- Physical
Women’s Guide to the UofC
http://wguide.uchicago.edu/9substance.html

Cannabis Basics
http://www.erowid.org/plants/cannab…is_basics.shtml

10 Things Every Parent, Teenager & Teacher Should Know About Marijuana (4th Q)
http://www.erowid.org/plants/cannab…is_flyer1.shtml

Marijuana Myths, Claim No. 9
http://www.erowid.org/plants/cannab…bis_myth9.shtml

AIDS – see HIV

Alcoholism
Role of cannabinoid receptors in alcohol abuse
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/30338.php

Cannabidiol, Antioxidants, and Diuretics in Reversing Binge Ethanol-Induced Neurotoxicity
http://jpet.aspetjournals.org/cgi/c…ourcetype=HWCIT

Cannabis substitution
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=86

Cannabis as a Substitute for Alcohol
http://ccrmg.org/journal/03sum/substitutealcohol.html

ALS
Cannabinol delays symptom onset
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/e…t_uids=16183560

Marijuana in the management of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/11467101

Cannabis use in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/15055508

Cannabis Relieves Lou Gehrigs Symptoms
http://www.rense.com/general51/lou.htm

Cannabis’ Potential Exciting Researchers in Treatment of ALS, Parkinson’s Disease
http://66.218.69.11/search/cache?ei…&icp=1&.intl=us

Alzheimers
MARIJUANA SLOWS ALZHEIMER’S DECLINE
http://www.mapinc.org/drugnews/v05/n307/a10.html

Marijuana may block Alzheimer’s
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/4286435.stm

Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease Pathology by Cannabinoids
http://www.jneurosci.org/cgi/content/abstract/25/8/1904

Marijuana’s Active Ingredient Shown to Inhibit Primary Marker of Alzheimer’s Disease
http://www.pacifier.com/~alive/articles/ca060809.htm

Dronabinol in the treatment of agitation in patients with Alzheimer’s disease with anorexia
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=61

Dronabinol in the treatment of refractory agitation in Alzheimer’s disease
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=92

Effects of dronabinol on anorexia and disturbed behavior in patients with Alzheimer’s disease.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=59

Cannabinoids reduce the progression of Alzheimer’s disease in animals
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=187#1

Molecular Link between the Active Component of Marijuana and Alzheimer’s Disease Pathology
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…sease_Pathology

THC inhibits primary marker of Alzheimer’s disease
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=225#3

——— Page 1

Amotivational Syndrome
Amotivational Syndrome
http://leda.lycaeum.org/?ID=12454

Marijuana Myths, Claim No. 11
http://www.erowid.org/plants/cannab…is_myth11.shtml

Debunking ‘Amotivational Syndrome’
http://www.mapinc.org/drugnews/v06/n400/a06.html

Amotivational Syndrome
http://www.bookrags.com/Amotivational_syndrome

Debunking the Amotivational Syndrome
http://www.drugscience.org/Petition/C3F.html

Cannabis Use Not Linked To So-Called “Amotivational Syndrome”
http://www.norml.org/index.cfm?Grou…tm_format=print

Anecdotal Evidence/First person stories
Shared Comments and Observations
http://www.rxmarihuana.com/comments…bservations.htm

Cannabis Sativa (Marijuana) for Fibromyalgia
http://www.fibromyalgia-reviews.com/Drg_Marijuana.cfm

ANECDOTAL ARTICLES
http://cannabislink.ca/medical/#medanecdotal

Testimonials
http://www.benefitsofmarijuana.com/testimonials.html

Excerpts of testimonials.
http://www.ganjaland.com/freemedicalseeds.htm

Appetite Stimulant
Dronabinol an effective appetite stimulant?
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=188

THC improves appetite and reverses weight loss in AIDS patients
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=189

Efficacy of dronabinol alone and in combination
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=191

Dronabinol and marijuana in HIV-positive marijuana smokers: caloric intake, mood, and sleep.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=190

The synthetic cannabinoid nabilone improves pain and symptom management in cancer patients
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=177

Dronabinol for supportive therapy in patients with malignant melanoma and liver metastases
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=180

Safety and efficacy of dronabinol in the treatment of agitation in patients with Alzheimer’s disease
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=61

The perceived effects of smoked cannabis on patients with multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=13

Effects of dronabinol on anorexia and disturbed behavior in patients with Alzheimer’s disease
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=59

Dronabinol as a treatment for anorexia associated with weight loss in patients with AIDS.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=21

Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol for appetite stimulation in cancer-associated anorexia
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=52

Effect of dronabinol on nutritional status in HIV infection.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=150

Dronabinol stimulates appetite and causes weight gain in HIV patients.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=20

Dronabinol effects on weight in patients with HIV infection.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=45

Recent clinical experience with dronabinol.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=90

Dronabinol enhancement of appetite in cancer patients.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=149

Effects of smoked marijuana on food intake and body weight
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=117

Behavioral analysis of marijuana effects on food intake in humans.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=118

Cancer-related anorexia-cachexia syndrome
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…xia_Study_Group

THC effective in appetite and weight loss in severe lung disease (COPD)
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=191#2

Machinery Of The ‘Marijuana Munchies’
http://www.sciencedaily.com/release…51226102503.htm

Arthritis
Cannabidiol is an oral anti-arthritic therapeutic in murine collagen-induced arthritis
http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/97/17/9561

The Cannabinergic System as a Target for Anti-inflammatory Therapies
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/conte…000013/art00008

Sativex in the treatment of pain caused by rheumatoid arthritis
http://rheumatology.oxfordjournals….bstract/45/1/50

Suppression of fibroblast metalloproteinases by ajulemic acid,
http://ccicnewsletter.com/index.php…06_Rheumatology

The antinociceptive effect of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol in the arthritic rat
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…binoid_receptor

Synergy between Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and morphine in the arthritic rat
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…e_arthritic_rat

Cannabis based medicine eases pain and suppresses disease
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/33376.php

Pot-Based Drug Promising for Arthritis
http://www.webmd.com/rheumatoid-art…g-for-arthritis

Asthma
The Cannabinergic System as a Target for Anti-inflammatory Therapies
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/conte…000013/art00008

Acute and subacute bronchial effects of oral cannabinoids.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=44

Comparison of bronchial effects of nabilone and terbutaline
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=43

Bronchial effects of aerosolized delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=109

Bronchodilator effect of delta1-tetrahydrocannabinol administered by aerosol
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=60

Effects of smoked marijuana in experimentally induced asthma.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=57

Marijuana and oral delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol on specific airway conductance
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=67

New Synthetic Delta-9-THC Inhaler Offers Safe, Rapid Delivery
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/22937.php

Smoked marijuana and oral delta-9-THC on specific airway conductance in asthmatic subjects
http://www.ukcia.org/research/Smoke…InAsthmatic.php

Atherosclerosis

Marijuana Chemical Fights Hardened Arteries
http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/…rdened-arteries

Does Cannabis Hold the Key to Treating Cardiometabolic Disease
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/525040_print

Cannabis may keep arteries clear
http://www.gnn.tv/headlines/2634/Ca…_arteries_clear

The Cannabinergic System as a Target for Anti-inflammatory Therapies
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/conte…000013/art00008

Cannabis compound tackles blood vessel disease
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/22658.php

Medical marijuana: study shows that THC slows atherosclerosis
http://thenexthurrah.typepad.com/th…al_marijua.html

Cardiovascular Effects of Cannabis
http://www.idmu.co.uk/canncardio.htm

Atrophie Blanche
Atrophie Blanche Treated With Cannabis and/or THC
http://ccrmg.org/journal/04spr/clinical.html#thm

Autism
Autism and Medical Marijuana
http://www.autism.org/marijuana.html

THE SAM PROJECT: James D.
http://www.letfreedomgrow.com/articles/james_d.htm

Medical marijuana: a valuable treatment for autism?
http://www.autismwebsite.com/ari/ne…r/marijuana.htm

——— Page 2

Cancer – breast
Anandamide inhibits human breast cancer cell proliferation
http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/95/14/8375

Inhibition of Human Breast and Prostate Cancer Cell Proliferation1
http://endo.endojournals.org/cgi/co…tract/141/1/118

Antitumor Activity of Plant Cannabinoids
http://jpet.aspetjournals.org/cgi/c…ract/318/3/1375

9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Inhibits Cell Cycle Progression in Human Breast Cancer
http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/c…ract/66/13/6615

Cannabidiol inhibits tumour growth in leukaemia and breast cancer
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=220#2

THC and prochlorperazine effective in reducing vomiting in women following breast surgery
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=219#1

Cancer- colorectal
Anandamide, induces cell death in colorectal carcinoma cells
http://gut.bmj.com/cgi/content/abstract/54/12/1741

Cannabinoids and cancer: potential for colorectal cancer therapy.
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/16042581

Cancer- glioma/ brain
Anti-tumor effects of cannabidiol
http://www.hempworld.com/HempPharm/…milanstudy.html

Pot’s cancer healing properties
http://www.november.org/stayinfo/br…ncerKiller.html

Cannabinoids Inhibit the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Pathway in Gliomas
http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/c…hort/64/16/5617

Inhibition of Glioma Growth in Vivo
http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/c…/61/15/5784.pdf

Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=193

Cannabidiol triggers caspase activation and oxidative stress in human glioma cells.
http://www.ihop-net.org/UniPub/iHOP…l?pmid=16909207

Cannabinoid receptors in human astroglial tumors
http://www.brainlife.org/abstracts/…t_j20060800.pdf

Cannabis extract makes brain tumors shrink, halts growth of blood vessels
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/12088.php

THC tested against brain tumour in pilot clinical study
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=222#1

Cancer- leukemia
Cannabis-induced cytotoxicity in leukemic cell lines
http://bloodjournal.hematologylibra…ract/105/3/1214

Cannabidiol-Induced Apoptosis in Human Leukemia Cells
http://molpharm.aspetjournals.org/c…stract/70/3/897

Marijuana’s Active Ingredient Kills Leukemia Cells
http://www.treatingyourself.com/vbu…read.php?t=7107

Targeting CB2 cannabinoid receptors to treat malignant lymphoblastic disease
http://bloodjournal.hematologylibra…t/100/2/627.pdf

Cannabinoids induce incomplete maturation of cultured human leukemia cells
http://www.osti.gov/energycitations…osti_id=5164483

{Delta}9-Tetrahydrocannabinol-Induced Apoptosis in Jurkat Leukemia T Cells
http://mcr.aacrjournals.org/cgi/con…bstract/4/8/549

Cannabidiol inhibits tumour growth in leukaemia and breast cancer
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=220#2

Cancer- lung
Antineoplastic activity of cannabinoids
http://www.ukcia.org/research/Antin…ds/default.html

Delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol inhibits epithelial growth factor-induced lung cancer cell migration
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…astasis_in_vivo

Smoking Cannabis Does Not Cause Cancer Of Lung or Upper Airways
http://ccrmg.org/journal/05aut/nocancer.html

No association between lung cancer and cannabis smoking in large study
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=219#2

Marijuana Smoking Found Non-Carcinogenic
http://www.medpagetoday.com/Hematol…gCancer/tb/3393

CLAIM #4: MARIJUANA CAUSES LUNG DISEASE
http://www.erowid.org/plants/cannab…bis_myth4.shtml

Cancer- melanoma
Dronabinol for supportive therapy in patients with malignant melanoma and liver metastases.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=180

Intractable nausea and vomiting due to gastrointestinal mucosal metastases
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=35

Cancer – oral
Smoking of cannabis does not increase risk for oral cancer
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=175#1

Marijuana use and Risk of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma
http://66.218.69.11/search/cache?ei…&icp=1&.intl=us

Cancer-pancreatic
Cannabinoids Induce Apoptosis of Pancreatic Tumor Cells
http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/c…ract/66/13/6748

Cancer – prostate
Inhibition of Human Breast and Prostate Cancer Cell Proliferation
http://endo.endojournals.org/cgi/co…tract/141/1/118

Cannabinoid Receptor as a Novel Target for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer
http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/c…t/65/5/1635.pdf

——- Page 3

Cancer – Risk Cannabis vs Tobacco
Cannabis Smoke and Cancer: Assessing the Risk
http://www.norml.org/index.cfm?Group_ID=6891

Cannabis and tobacco smoke are not equally carcinogenic
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/ar…i?artid=1277837

Smoking Marijuana Does Not Cause Lung Cancer
http://www.mapinc.org/drugnews/v05/n1065/a03.html

Blunt Smokers Link Dependence Potential To Nicotine
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/52838.php

Premiere British Medical Journal Pronounces Marijuana Safer Than Alcohol, Tobacco
http://cannabislink.ca/medical/safer.html

Why Doesn’t Smoking Marijuana Cause Cancer?
http://www.healthcentral.com/drdean/408/14275.html

Marijuana Smoking Found Non-Carcinogenic
http://www.medpagetoday.com/Hematol…gCancer/tb/3393

Cancer – Skin
Inhibition of skin tumor growth
http://www.jci.org/cgi/content/full…y=MpUgjDbqHybAU

Cannabis Reduces Skin Cancer
http://www.onlinepot.org/medical/skincancerreport.htm

Cancer – Testicular
The antiemetic efficacy of nabilone
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=127

Chemotherapy for Testicular Cancer
http://www.rxmarihuana.com/shared_c…icularchemo.htm

Cancer –various/ unnamed
Derivatives of cannabis for anti-cancer treatment
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_relea…uo-do060605.php

Cancer Killer
http://www.november.org/stayinfo/br…ncerKiller.html

Anandamide Induces Apoptosis
http://www.jbc.org/cgi/content/abstract/275/41/31938

Nabilone improves pain and symptom management
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=177

The effects of smoked cannabis in painful peripheral neuropathy
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=96

Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol for appetite stimulation
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=52

Dronabinol and prochlorperazine in combination
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=28

Dronabinol enhancement of appetite in cancer patients.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=149

Efficacy of tetrahydrocannabinol
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=31

Inhalation marijuana as an antiemetic for cancer chemotherapy.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=155

Nabilone versus domperidone
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=129

Inhalation marijuana as an antiemetic for cancer chemotherapy.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=155

Nabilone vs. placebo in chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=156

The antiemetic activity of tetrahydrocanabinol versus metoclopramide
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=24

Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol as an antiemetic for patients receiving cancer chemotherapy
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=5

Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol as an antiemetic in cancer patients receiving high-dose methotrexate
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=23

Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) as an antiemetic in patients treated with cancer chemotherapy
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=27

Amelioration of cancer chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting by delta-9-THC
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=107

Superiority of nabilone over prochlorperazine as an antiemetic
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=126

Analgesic effect of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=16

The analgesic properties of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and codeine.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=17

Comparison of orally administered cannabis extract and delta-9-THC
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…xia_Study_Group

Cannabis May Help Combat Cancer-causing Herpes Viruses
http://www.sciencedaily.com/release…40923092627.htm

Marijuana Smoking Found Non-Carcinogenic
http://www.medpagetoday.com/Hematol…gCancer/tb/3393

Cannabidiol
Cannabidiol, Antioxidants, and Diuretics in Reversing Binge Ethanol-Induced Neurotoxicity
http://jpet.aspetjournals.org/cgi/c…ourcetype=HWCIT

Cannabinol delays symptom onset
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/e…t_uids=16183560

Cannabidiol is an oral anti-arthritic therapeutic in murine collagen-induced arthritis
http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/97/17/9561

Cannabidiol inhibits tumour growth in leukaemia and breast cancer
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=220#2

Anti-tumor effects of cannabidiol
http://www.hempworld.com/HempPharm/…milanstudy.html

Cannabidiol triggers caspase activation and oxidative stress in human glioma cells.
http://www.ihop-net.org/UniPub/iHOP…l?pmid=16909207

Cannabidiol-Induced Apoptosis in Human Leukemia Cells
http://molpharm.aspetjournals.org/c…stract/70/3/897

Cannabidiol inhibits tumour growth in leukaemia and breast cancer
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=220#2

Cannabidiol lowers incidence of diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/conte…sn7o5efqr.alice

Neuroprotective and Blood-Retinal Barrier-Preserving Effects of Cannabidiol
http://ajp.amjpathol.org/cgi/content/full/168/1/235

Evaluation of cannabidiol in dystonic movement disorders
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=14

Cannabidiol in dystonic movement disorders.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=139

Beneficial and adverse effects of cannabidiol in a Parkinson patient
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=142

Treatment of Meige’s syndrome with cannabidiol.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=114

CANNABIDIOL TO HEALTHY VOLUNTEERS AND EPILEPTIC PATIENTS
http://web.acsalaska.net/~warmgun/es201.html

Chronic administration of cannabidiol to healthy volunteers and epileptic patients.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=42

Neuroprotective effect of (-)Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…f_peroxynitrite

EFFECTS OF CANNABIDIOL IN HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer…al/hunting1.htm

The therapeutic rationale for combining tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol.
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/16209908

Cannabidiol has a cerebroprotective action
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…iting_mechanism

Cannabidiol as an antipsychotic
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=171

Cannabidiol, a constituent of Cannabis sativa, modulates sleep in rats.
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abs…844117?prt=true

Who’s Afraid of Cannabidiol?
http://www.counterpunch.org/gardner07142007.html

Chemical composition
Cannabis: A source of useful pharma compounds
http://www.medpot.net/forums/index.php?showtopic=18608

Pharmacokinetics and cannabinoid action using oral cannabis extract
http://www.pharma-lexicon.com/medic…hp?newsid=29638

Pharmacokinetics of cannabinoids
http://66.218.69.11/search/cache?ei…&icp=1&.intl=us

The chemistry and biological activity of cannabis
http://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/bulle….html?print=yes

Differential effects of medical marijuana based on strain and route of administration
http://www.medicalmarijuanaprocon.o…trainsstudy.pdf

What is THC?
http://www.medicalmarijuanaprocon.o…1.0373456855945

Cannabis / Marijuana ( ? 9 -Tetrahydrocannabinol, THC)
http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/people/inj…gs/cannabis.htm

———- Page 4

Chemotherapy
Efficacy of dronabinol alone and in combination
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=191

Dronabinol for supportive therapy in patients with malignant melanoma and liver metastases
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=180

Intractable nausea and vomiting
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=35

An efficient new cannabinoid antiemetic in pediatric oncology
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=7

Dronabinol and prochlorperazine in combination
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=28

Marijuana as antiemetic medicine
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=134

Efficacy of tetrahydrocannabinol in patients refractory to standard anti-emetic therapy
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=31

Inhalation marijuana as an antiemetic for cancer chemotherapy.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=155

Nabilone versus prochlorperazine
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=120

Nabilone: an alternative antiemetic for cancer chemotherapy.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=123

Antiemetic efficacy of nabilone and alizapride
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=127

Nabilone versus domperidone
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=129

THC or Compazine for the cancer chemotherapy patient
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=34

Comparison of nabilone and prochlorperazine
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=128

Nabilone vs. prochlorperazine for refractory emesis
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=146

Nabilone vs. placebo
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=156

Tetrahydroannabinol (THC) vs prochlorperazine as chemotherapy antiemetics.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=30

Comparative trial of the antiemetic effects of THC and haloperidol
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=64

Comparison of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and prochlorperazine
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=3

Delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol in cancer chemotherapy.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=88

Antiemetic effect of tetrahydrocannabinol
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=6

Tetrahydrocanabinol versus metoclopramide and thiethylperazine
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=24

Effects of nabilone and prochlorperazine on chemotherapy-induced emesis
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=131

Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol as an antiemetic
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=5

Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol as an antiemetic in cancer patients receiving high-dose methotrexate
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=23

THC as an antiemetic in patients treated with cancer chemotherapy
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=27

Amelioration of cancer chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting by delta-9-THC
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=107

Superiority of nabilone over prochlorperazine
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=126

Antiemetic effect of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=4

Children
Experiences with THC-treatment in children and adolescents
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=80

An efficient new cannabinoid antiemetic in pediatric oncology.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=7

Nabilone versus prochlorperazine for control of cancer chemotherapy-induced emesis in children
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=120

Nabilone: an alternative antiemetic for cancer chemotherapy.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=123

Marijuana and ADD Therapeutic uses of Medical Marijuana in the treatment of ADD
http://www.onlinepot.org/medical/add&mmj.htm

Oily fish makes ‘babies brainier’
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/4631006.stm

Cannabis is a First-Line Treatment for Childhood Mental Disorders
http://www.counterpunch.org/mikuriya07082006.html

Ganja use among Jamaican women.
http://www.rism.org/isg/dlp/ganja/a…anjaBabyes.html

Dreher’s Jamaican Pregnancy Study
http://www.november.org/stayinfo/br…reherStudy.html

Cannabis Relieves Morning Sickness
http://ccrmg.org/journal/06spr/dreher.html#morning

Moderate cannabis use not harmful to the brain of adolescents, M R I study finds
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=218#3

No brain structural change associated with adolescent cannabis use
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/bo…l&artid=1524733

No ‘Smoking’ Gun: Research Indicates Teen Marijuana Use Does Not Predict Drug, Alcohol Abuse
http://www.sciencedaily.com/release…61204123422.htm

Pot May Not Shrink Teens’ Brains After All
http://www.medpagetoday.com/Neurolo…urology/tb/3242

Chronic Cystitis
Cannabinoid rotation in a young woman with chronic cystitis
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=115

CPOD
THC effective in appetite and weight loss in severe lung disease (COPD)
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=191#2

Heavy Long-Term Marijuana Use Does Not Impair Lung Function
http://www.erowid.org/plants/cannab…is_media7.shtml

Diabetes
Cannabinoid Reduces Incidence Of Diabetes
http://www.norml.org/index.cfm?Group_ID=6909

Marijuana Compound May Help Stop Diabetic Retinopathy
http://www.sciencedaily.com/release…60227184647.htm

Cannabidiol lowers incidence of diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/conte…sn7o5efqr.alice

Anticoagulant Effects of a Cannabis Extract in an Obese Rat Model
http://www.level1diet.com/research/id/14687

Neuroprotective and Blood-Retinal Barrier-Preserving Effects of Cannabidiol
http://ajp.amjpathol.org/cgi/content/full/168/1/235

The Cannabinergic System as a Target for Anti-inflammatory Therapies
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/conte…000013/art00008

Effect of tetrahydrocurcumin on blood glucose, plasma insulin and hepatic key enzymes
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…d_diabetic_rats

Cannabidiol reduces the development of diabetes in an animal study
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=219#3

Depression
Cannabinoids promote hippocampus neurogenesis and produce anxiolytic- and antidepressant
http://www.jci.org/cgi/content/full/115/11/3104

Antidepressant-like activity by blockade of anandamide hydrolysis
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/ar…bmedid=16352709

Decreased depression in marijuana users.
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/15964704

Antidepressant-like activity
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/ar…bmedid=16352709

Dronabinol and marijuana in HIV-positive marijuana smokers: caloric intake, mood, and sleep.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=190

Nabilone improves pain and symptom management in cancer patients
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=177

The perceived effects of smoked cannabis on patients with multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=13

Cannabis and Depression
http://www.pacifier.com/~alive/cmu/…nd_cannabis.htm

Association between cannabis use and depression may not be causal, study says
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=177#4

Marijuana use and depression among adults: Testing for causal associations.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/e…Pubmed_RVDocSum

Do patients use marijuana as an antidepressant?
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/e…Pubmed_RVDocSum

Dermatitis
Efficacy of dietary hempseed oil in patients with atopic dermatitis.
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abs…ryText=hempseed

Dronabinol
Dronabinol in the treatment of agitation in patients with Alzheimer’s disease with anorexia
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=61

Dronabinol in the treatment of refractory agitation in Alzheimer’s disease
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=92

Effects of dronabinol on anorexia and disturbed behavior in patients with Alzheimer’s disease.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=59

Dronabinol an effective appetite stimulant?
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=188

Safety and efficacy of dronabinol in the treatment of agitation in patients with Alzheimer’s disease
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=61

Effect of dronabinol on nutritional status in HIV infection.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=150

Dronabinol stimulates appetite and causes weight gain in HIV patients.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=20

Dronabinol effects on weight in patients with HIV infection.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=45

Recent clinical experience with dronabinol.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=90

Dronabinol enhancement of appetite in cancer patients.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=149

Dronabinol for supportive therapy in patients with malignant melanoma and liver metastases.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=180

Dronabinol and prochlorperazine in combination
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=28

Dronabinol enhancement of appetite in cancer patients.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=149

Efficacy of dronabinol alone and in combination
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=191

Dronabinol and marijuana in HIV-positive marijuana smokers: caloric intake, mood, and sleep.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=190

Dronabinol and retinal hemodynamics in humans.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=202

Dronabinol reduces signs and symptoms of idiopathic intracranial hypertension
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=181

Nausea relieved by tetrahydrocannabinol (dronabinol).
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=35

Dronabinol in patients with intractable pruritus secondary to cholestatic liver disease.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=116

Treatment of spasticity in spinal cord injury with dronabinol
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=112

Cannabinoid Activator Mellows Out Colon
http://www.medpagetoday.com/MeetingCoverage/ACG/tb/4410

Drug testing
Hemp oil causes positive urine tests for THC
http://www.druglibrary.org/crl/drug…0JAnToxicol.pdf

Dystonia
Cannabis sativa and dystonia secondary to Wilson’s disease.
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/15390041

Experiences with THC-treatment in children and adolescents
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=80

Evaluation of cannabidiol in dystonic movement disorders
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=14

Cannabidiol in dystonic movement disorders.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=139

Beneficial and adverse effects of cannabidiol in a Parkinson patient
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=142

Treatment of Meige’s syndrome with cannabidiol.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=114

———- Page 5

Endocannabinoid Deficiency
Clinical Endocannabinoid Deficiency
http://www.freedomtoexhale.com/clinical.pdf

The endocannabinoid system is dysregulated in multiple sclerosis
http://brain.oxfordjournals.org/cgi…stract/awm160v1

Cannabinoids inhibit neurodegeneration in models of multiple sclerosis
http://brain.oxfordjournals.org/cgi…ull/126/10/2191

Epilepsy
Epilepsy patients are smoking pot
http://www.safeaccessnow.org/article.php?id=1638

CANNABIDIOL TO HEALTHY VOLUNTEERS AND EPILEPTIC PATIENTS
http://web.acsalaska.net/~warmgun/es201.html

Experiences with THC-treatment in children and adolescents
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=80

Chronic administration of cannabidiol to healthy volunteers and epileptic patients.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=42

Anticonvulsant nature of marihuana smoking.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=39

Cannabis may help epileptics
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/4423.php

Hypnotic and Antiepileptic Effects of Cannabidiol
http://www.thecompassionclub.org/me…rue&pageNumber=

Marijuana: an effective antiepileptic treatment in partial epilepsy?
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=157

Familial Mediterranean Fever
Pain relief with oral cannabinoids in familial Mediterranean fever.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=18

Fertility
Synthetic Cannabinoid May Aid Fertility In Smokers
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/58063.php

Medical marijuana uses – 700 medical marijuana clinical studies and papers

Fever
A Novel Role of Cannabinoids
http://ccicnewsletter.com/index.php…nfectious_Disea

A Cooling Effect From Cannabis?
http://ccrmg.org/journal/05aut/coolcannabis.html

Fibromyalgia
Delta-9-THC based monotherapy in fibromyalgia patients
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/16834825

Clinical Endocannabinoid Deficiency
http://www.freedomtoexhale.com/clinical.pdf

Cannabis Sativa (Marijuana) for Fibromyalgia
http://www.fibromyalgia-reviews.com/Drg_Marijuana.cfm

THC Reduces Pain in Fibromyalgia Patients
http://www.illinoisnorml.org/content/view/63/35/

Gateway Theory
The Myth of Marijuana’s Gateway Effect
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer/library/mjgate.htm

Endogenous cannabinoids are not involved in cocaine reinforcement
http://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc…a4e861a90579fac

No ‘Smoking’ Gun: Research Indicates Teen Marijuana Use Does Not Predict Drug, Alcohol Abuse
http://www.sciencedaily.com/release…61204123422.htm

CLAIM #13:MARIJUANA IS A “GATEWAY” TO THE USE OF OTHER DRUGS
http://www.erowid.org/plants/cannab…is_myth13.shtml

Glaucoma
Marijuana Smoking vs Cannabinoids for Glaucoma Therapy
http://archopht.ama-assn.org/cgi/co…act/116/11/1433

Dronabinol and retinal hemodynamics in humans.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=202

Effect of Sublingual Application of Cannabinoids on Intraocular Pressure
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=201

Delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol in cancer chemotherapy. Ophthalmologic implications.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=88

Effect of marihuana on intraocular and blood pressure in glaucoma.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=87

Effect of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on intraocular pressure in humans.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=40

Marihuana smoking and intraocular pressure.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=47

Neuroprotective and Intraocular Pressure-Lowering Effects of (-)Delta-Tetrahydrocannabinol
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…del_of_Glaucoma

Neuroprotective effect of (-)Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…f_peroxynitrite

Effects of tetrahydrocannabinol on arterial and intraocular hypertension.
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/468444

Gynocology and obstetrics
Cannabis Treatments in Obstetrics and Gynecology: A Historical Review
http://www.freedomtoexhale.com/russo-ob.pdf

Heart Disease/ Cardiovascular
Marijuana Chemical Fights Hardened Arteries
http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/…rdened-arteries

The endogenous cardiac cannabinoid system: a new protective mechanism
http://www.cannabinoid.com/boards/thd3x10073.shtml

Cardiovascular pharmacology of cannabinoids.
http://www.biowizard.com/story.php?pmid=16596789

Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol protects cardiac cells from hypoxia
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/conte…020001/00002346

Does Cannabis Hold the Key to Treating Cardiometabolic Disease?
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/525040_print

Cannabinoid Offers Cardioprotection
http://www.norml.org/index.cfm?Grou…tm_format=print

Heavy Cannabis Use Not Independently Associated With Cardiovascular Risks
http://www.norml.org/index.cfm?Group_ID=6972

Marijuana use, diet, body mass index, and cardiovascular risk factors
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/16893701

Cannabinoids and cardiovascular disease
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…ical_treatments

Cannabinoids as therapeutic agents in cardiovascular disease
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…s_and_illusions

The in vitro and in vivo cardiovascular effects of {Delta}9-tetrahydrocannabinol
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…_oxide_synthase

Cannabinoids prevented the development of heart failure in animal study
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=145#2

Cannabis use not associated with risk factors for diseases of heart and circulation
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=225#2

THC protects heart cells in the case of lowered oxygen supply
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=212#1

Medical marijuana: study shows that THC slows atherosclerosis
http://thenexthurrah.typepad.com/th…al_marijua.html

Cardiovascular Effects of Cannabis
http://www.idmu.co.uk/canncardio.htm

Changes in middle cerebral artery velocity after marijuana
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/e…0&dopt=Abstract[/]

—– Page 6

Hepatitis
Moderate Cannabis Use Associated with Improved Treatment Response
http://www.hivandhepatitis.com/hep_…6/091506_a.html

Cannabis use improves retention and virological outcomes in patients treated for hepatitis C
http://www.natap.org/2006/HCV/091506_02.htm

Hepatitis C – The Silent Killer Can Medical Cannabis Help?
http://www.pacifier.com/~alive/cmu/hepatitis_c.htm

Herpes
Cannabis May Help Combat Cancer-causing Herpes Viruses
http://www.sciencedaily.com/release…40923092627.htm

THC inhibits lytic replication of gamma oncogenic herpes viruses in vitro
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/bo…ml&artid=521080

Suppressive effect of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on herpes simplex virus infectivity in vitro
http://www.ebmonline.org/cgi/content/abstract/196/4/401

Inhibition of cell-associated herpes simplex virus
http://www.ebmonline.org/cgi/content/abstract/185/1/41

The Effect of {Delta}-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol on Herpes Simplex Virus Replication
http://vir.sgmjournals.org/cgi/cont…stract/49/2/427

Hiccups
Marijuana cures hiccups
http://www.yourhealthbase.com/database/a77k.htm

Marijuana For Intractable Hiccups
http://cannabislink.ca/medical/hiccups.html

HIV / AIDS
Marijuana Use Does Not Accelerate HIV Infection
http://paktribune.com/news/print.php?id=139255

THC improves appetite and reverses weight loss in AIDS patients
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=189

Dronabinol and marijuana in HIV-positive marijuana smokers: caloric intake, mood, and sleep.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=190

Cannabis in painful HIV-associated sensory neuropathy
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=199

Smoked cannabis therapy for HIV-related painful peripheral neuropathy
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=172

Short-term effects of cannabinoids in patients with HIV-1 infection
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=62

Dronabinol as a treatment for anorexia associated with weight loss in patients with AIDS.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=21

Effect of dronabinol on nutritional status in HIV infection.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=150

Dronabinol stimulates appetite and causes weight gain in HIV patients.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=20

Dronabinol effects on weight in patients with HIV infection.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=45

Recent clinical experience with dronabinol.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=90

Marijuana as therapy for people living with HIV/AIDS: Social and health aspects
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…_health_aspects

Marijuana and AIDS: A Four-Year Study
http://ccrmg.org/journal/05spr/aids.html

Historical studies
The La Guardia Committee Report
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer…lag/lagmenu.htm

Physical, Mental, and Moral Effects of Marijuana: The Indian Hemp Drugs Commission Report
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer/Library/effects.htm

MARIAJUANA SMOKING IN PANAMA
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer…ama/panama1.htm

The British Pharmaceutical Codex – 1934
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer…ical/brit34.htm

ON THE PREPARATIONS OF THE INDIAN HEMP, OR GUNJAH
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer…1850/gunjah.htm

DISPENSATORY OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Fifth Edition (1843)
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer…ry/dispensa.htm

New Remedies:Pharmaceutically and Therapeutically Considered Fourth Edition (1843)
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer…ry/dunglisn.htm

On the Haschisch or Cannabis Indica
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer…ry/bellhash.htm

ON INDICATIONS OF THE HACHISH-VICE IN THE OLD TESTAMENT
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer…tory/hashot.htm

The Physiological Activity of Cannabis Sativa
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer…istory/japa.htm

CANNABIS, U.S.P. (American Cannabis):
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer…ry/vbchmed1.htm

Hormones
Effects of chronic marijuana use on testosterone, luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating …
http://www.anesth.uiowa.edu/readabs…sp?PMID=1935564

Marijuana: interaction with the estrogen receptor
http://jpet.aspetjournals.org/cgi/c…tract/224/2/404

Huntington’s Disease
EFFECTS OF CANNABIDIOL IN HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer…al/hunting1.htm

Nabilone Could Treat Chorea and Irritability in Huntington’s Disease
http://neuro.psychiatryonline.org/c…/18/4/553?rss=1

Hysterectomy
Effect of nabilone on nausea and vomiting after total abdominal hysterectomy
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=137

Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension
Dronabinol reduces signs and symptoms of idiopathic intracranial hypertension
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=181

IQ
Findings of a longitudinal study of effects on IQ
http://www.cmaj.ca/cgi/content/full/166/7/887

Heavy cannabis use without long-term effect on global intelligence
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=115#2

Marijuana does not dent IQ permanently
http://www.newscientist.com/article…ermanently.html

Marinol/Synthetics/ cannabinoid mixtures
CANNABIS AND MARINOL IN THE TREATMENT OF MIGRAINE HEADACHE
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer/hemp/migrn2.htm

Marinol vs Natural Cannabis
http://www.norml.org/pdf_files/NORM…al_Cannabis.pdf

The therapeutic rationale for combining tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol.
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/16209908

Unheated Cannabis sativa extracts and its major compound THC-acid
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abs…504929?prt=true

Side effects of pharmaceuticals not elicited by comparable herbal medicines.
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/10394675

Sativex in the treatment of pain caused by rheumatoid arthritis
http://rheumatology.oxfordjournals….bstract/45/1/50

Is dronabinol an effective appetite stimulant?
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=188

Sativex in patients suffering from multiple sclerosis associated detrusor overactivity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=168

Sativex® in patients with symptoms of spasticity due to multiple sclerosis
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=169

Nabilone improves pain and symptom management in cancer patients
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=177

Dronabinol for supportive therapy in patients with malignant melanoma and liver metastases
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=180

Synthetic cannabinomimetic nabilone on patients with chronic pain
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=197

Nabilone significantly reduces spasticity-related pain
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=200

Sativex produced significant improvements in a subjective measure of spasticity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=170

Analgesic effect of the synthetic cannabinoid CT-3 on chronic neuropathic pain
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=85

Cannabinoid rotation in a young woman with chronic cystitis
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=115

Dronabinol in patients with intractable pruritus
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=116

Cannabinoids reduce levodopa-induced dyskinesia in Parkinson’s disease:
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=54

Nabilone on L-DOPA induced dyskinesia in patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=153

Nabilone in the treatment of multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=11

Big Pharma’s Strange Holy Grail: Cannabis Without Euphoria?
http://www.counterpunch.org/gardner07082006.html

Sativex showed positive effects in 65 per cent of patients with chronic diseases
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=230#4

Meige’s Syndrome
Treatment of Meige’s syndrome with cannabidiol.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=114

Migraine/ Headache
CANNABIS AND MARINOL IN THE TREATMENT OF MIGRAINE HEADACHE
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer/hemp/migrn2.htm

Dronabinol reduces signs and symptoms of idiopathic intracranial hypertension
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=181

Cannabis and Migraine
http://www.pacifier.com/~alive/cmu/…nd_migraine.htm

Clinical Endocannabinoid Deficiency
http://www.freedomtoexhale.com/clinical.pdf

Hemp for Headache
http://www.freedomtoexhale.com/hh.pdf

Chronic Migraine Headache
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer/hemp/migrn1.htm

Morning Sickness
Medical marijuana: a surprising solution to severe morning sickness http://www.findarticles.com/p/artic…124/ai_n6015580

Medicinal cannabis use among childbearing women
http://safeaccess.ca/research/cannabis_nausea2006.pdf

Mortality Rates
Marijuana use and mortality.
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/ar…i?artid=1380837

Marijuana Smoking Doesn’t Lead to Higher Death Rate
http://ccrmg.org/journal/03sum/kaiser.html

How deadly is marijuana?
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/4426.php

———– Page 7

MS
Sativex in patients with symptoms of spasticity due to multiple sclerosis
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=169

Marijuana derivatives may provide MS treatment
http://www.healthypages.net/news.asp?newsid=5381

Marijuana Helps MS Patients Alleviate Pain, Spasms
http://www.mult-sclerosis.org/news/…smsAndPain.html

Cannabis-based medicine in central pain in multiple sclerosis
http://www.neurology.org/cgi/conten…t/65/6/812?etoc

Cannabis-based medicine in spasticity caused by multiple sclerosis
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=192

Sativex in patients suffering from multiple sclerosis associated detrusor overactivity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=168

The effect of cannabis on urge incontinence in patients with multiple sclerosis
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=185

Nabilone significantly reduces spasticity-related pain
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=200

Cannabinoids in multiple sclerosis (CAMS) study
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=160

Sativex produced significant improvements in a subjective measure of spasticity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=170

Cannabis-based medicine in central pain in multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=175

Do cannabis-based medicinal extracts have general or specific effects
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=56

Efficacy, safety and tolerability of an oral cannabis extract in the treatment of spasticity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=63

cannabis-based extracts for bladder dysfunction in advanced multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=81

Are oral cannabinoids safe and effective in refractory neuropathic pain?
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=143

Dronabinol in the treatment of agitation in patients with Alzheimer’s disease with anorexia
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=61

Cannabis based medicinal extracts (CBME) in central neuropathic pain due to multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=82

Cannabinoids for treatment of spasticity and other symptoms related to multiple sclerosis
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=108

Cannabis based medicinal extract on refractory lower urinary tract dysfunction
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=103

Analgesic effect of the cannabinoid analogue nabilone
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=203

The perceived effects of smoked cannabis on patients with multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=13

Orally and rectally administered delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on spasticity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=12

Nabilone in the treatment of multiple sclerosis
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=11

Effect of cannabinoids on spasticity and ataxia in multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=2

Delta-9-THC in the treatment of spasticity associated with multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=1

Tetrahydrocannabinol for tremor in multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=9

Marihuana as a therapeutic agent for muscle spasm or spasticity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=53

Cannabis-based medicine in spasticity caused by multiple sclerosis.
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…tiple_sclerosis

Cannabis based treatments for neuropathic and multiple sclerosis-related pain.
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…is_related_pain

The effect of cannabis on urge incontinence in patients with multiple sclerosis
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…ial__CAMS_LUTS_

Can Cannabis Help Multiple Sclerosis? An International Debate Rages
http://www.pacifier.com/~alive/cmu/…bis_help_ms.htm

Cannabis’ Potential Exciting Researchers in Treatment of ALS, Parkinson’s Disease
http://66.218.69.11/search/cache?ei…&icp=1&.intl=us

The endocannabinoid system is dysregulated in multiple sclerosis
http://brain.oxfordjournals.org/cgi…stract/awm160v1

Cannabinoids inhibit neurodegeneration in models of multiple sclerosis
http://brain.oxfordjournals.org/cgi…ull/126/10/2191

Nabilone
The synthetic cannabinoid nabilone improves pain and symptom management in cancer patients
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=177

Nabilone versus prochlorperazine
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=120

Nabilone: an alternative antiemetic for cancer chemotherapy.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=123

Antiemetic efficacy of nabilone and alizapride
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=127

Nabilone versus domperidone
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=129

Comparison of nabilone and prochlorperazine
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=128

Nabilone vs. prochlorperazine for refractory emesis
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=146

Nabilone vs. placebo
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=156

Effects of nabilone and prochlorperazine on chemotherapy-induced emesis
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=131

Superiority of nabilone over prochlorperazine
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=126

Nabilone versus prochlorperazine for control of cancer chemotherapy-induced emesis in children
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=120

Nabilone: an alternative antiemetic for cancer chemotherapy.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=123

Effect of nabilone on nausea and vomiting after total abdominal hysterectomy
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=137

Nabilone improves pain and symptom management in cancer patients
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=177

Synthetic cannabinomimetic nabilone on patients with chronic pain
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=197

Nabilone significantly reduces spasticity-related pain
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=200

Nabilone on L-DOPA induced dyskinesia in patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=153

Nabilone in the treatment of multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=11

Nabilone significantly reduces spasticity-related pain
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=200

Analgesic effect of the cannabinoid analogue nabilone
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=203

Nabilone in the treatment of multiple sclerosis
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=11

Comparison of nabilone and metoclopramide in the control of radiation-induced nausea.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=130

Nabilone and metoclopramide in the treatment of nausea and vomiting
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=121

Nabilone: an alternative antiemetic for cancer chemotherapy.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=123

Comparison of the antiemetic efficacy of nabilone and alizapride
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=127

Nabilone versus domperidone in the treatment of cytotoxic-induced emesis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=129

Add-on treatment with the synthetic cannabinomimetic nabilone on patients with chronic pain -
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=197

Comparison of bronchial effects of nabilone and terbutaline
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=43

Nabilone Could Treat Chorea and Irritability in Huntington’s Disease
http://neuro.psychiatryonline.org/c…/18/4/553?rss=1

Nausea
THC improves appetite and reverses weight loss in AIDS patients
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=189

Efficacy of dronabinol alone and in combination with ondansetron versus ondansetron alone
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=191

Dronabinol and marijuana in HIV-positive marijuana smokers: caloric intake, mood, and sleep.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=190

Nabilone improves pain and symptom management in cancer patients
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=177

Dronabinol for supportive therapy in patients with malignant melanoma and liver metastases.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=180

Nausea relieved by tetrahydrocannabinol (dronabinol).
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=35

An efficient new cannabinoid antiemetic in pediatric oncology.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=7

Effect of nabilone on nausea and vomiting after total abdominal hysterectomy.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=137

Marijuana as antiemetic medicine
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=134

Efficacy of tetrahydrocannabinol in patients refractory to standard anti-emetic therapy
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=31

Inhalation marijuana as an antiemetic for cancer chemotherapy.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=155

Nabilone versus prochlorperazine for control of cancer chemotherapy-induced emesis in children
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=120

Comparison of nabilone and metoclopramide in the control of radiation-induced nausea.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=130

Nabilone and metoclopramide in the treatment of nausea and vomiting
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=121

Nabilone: an alternative antiemetic for cancer chemotherapy.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=123

Comparison of the antiemetic efficacy of nabilone and alizapride
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=127

Nabilone versus domperidone in the treatment of cytotoxic-induced emesis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=129

THC or Compazine for the cancer chemotherapy patient–the UCLA study
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=34

Comparison of nabilone and prochlorperazine for emesis induced by cancer chemotherapy.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=128

Acute and subacute bronchial effects of oral cannabinoids.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=44

Nabilone vs. prochlorperazine for refractory emesis induced by cancer chemotherapy.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=146

Nabilone vs. placebo in chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=156

Dose vs response of tetrahydroannabinol (THC) vs prochlorperazine
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=30 delta 9-

Comparative trial of the antiemetic effects of THC and haloperidol
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=64

Comparison of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and prochlorperazine.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=3

Tetrahydrocannabinol in cancer chemotherapy. Ophthalmologic implications.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=88

Antiemetic effect of tetrahydrocannabinol
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=6

The antiemetic activity of tetrahydrocanabinol versus metoclopramide and thiethylperazine
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=24

The antiemetic effects of nabilone and prochlorperazine on chemotherapy-induced emesis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=131

Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol as an antiemetic for patients receiving cancer chemotherapy
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=5

Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol as an antiemetic in cancer patients receiving high-dose methotrexate
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=23

THC as an antiemetic in patients treated with cancer chemotherapy
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=27

Amelioration of cancer chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting by delta-9-THC.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=107

Superiority of nabilone over prochlorperazine as an antiemetic
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=126

Antiemetic effect of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=4

Receptor mechanism and antiemetic activity of structurally-diverse cannabinoids
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…the_least_shrew

Neurons
Marijuana Promotes Neuron Growth
http://www.medpot.net/forums/index.php?showtopic=27460

Marijuana-Like Chemicals in the Brain Calm Neurons
http://www.medpot.net/forums/index.php?showtopic=9686

Marijuana May Spur New Brain Cells
http://www.treatingyourself.com/vbu…read.php?t=5921

Cannabinoids promote embryonic and adult hippocampus neurogenesis
http://www.jci.org/cgi/content/full/115/11/3104

Medical marijuana uses – 700 medical marijuana clinical studies and papers

————— Page 8

Neuropathic pain
Cannabinoids Among Most Promising Approaches to Treating Neuropathic Pain
http://www.redorbit.com/news/health…source=r_health

Cannabis-based medicine in central pain in multiple sclerosis
http://www.neurology.org/cgi/conten…t/65/6/812?etoc

Cannabis in painful HIV-associated sensory neuropathy
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=199

Smoked cannabis therapy for HIV-related painful peripheral neuropathy
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=172

Two cannabis based medicinal extracts for relief of central neuropathic pain
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=143

Cannabis based medicinal extracts (CBME) in central neuropathic pain due to multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=82

Analgesic effect of the synthetic cannabinoid CT-3 on chronic neuropathic pain
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=85

Smoked cannabis in painful peripheral neuropathy and cancer pain refractory to opiods.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=96

Analgesic effect of the cannabinoid analogue nabilone
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=203

The perceived effects of smoked cannabis on patients with multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=13

Cannabis based treatments for neuropathic and multiple sclerosis-related pain.
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…is_related_pain

Neuroprotectant
Marijuana Protects Your Brain
http://www.roninpub.com/art-mjbrain.html

The neuroprotective effect of cannabinoids in a rat model of Parkinson’s disease
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/17196181

Neuroprotective and Intraocular Pressure-Lowering Effects of (-)Delta-THC
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…del_of_Glaucoma

Neuroprotective effect of (-)Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…f_peroxynitrite

Neuroprotection induced by Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in AF5 cells
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…ol_in_AF5_cells

Cannabidiol has a cerebroprotective action
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…iting_mechanism

Cannabidiol but not Delta(9)-THC has a neuroprotective effect without the development of tolerance..
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…nt_of_tolerance

Delta(9)-THC) prevents cerebral infarction
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…ent_hypothermia

Delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol protects hippocampal neurons from excitotoxicity
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…_excitotoxicity

Cannabis and Neuroprotection
http://www.pacifier.com/~alive/cmu/…oprotection.htm

Medical marijuana uses – 700 medical marijuana clinical studies and papers

Nutrition
Oily fish makes ‘babies brainier’
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/4631006.stm

Efficacy of dietary hempseed oil in patients with atopic dermatitis.
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abs…ryText=hempseed

Effects of smoked marijuana on food intake and body weight
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=117

Obesity
Does Cannabis Hold the Key to Treating Cardiometabolic Disease?
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/525040_print

Effects of smoked marijuana on food intake and body weight
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=117

Osteoporosis
Prototype drug to prevent osteoporosis based on cannabinoids
http://www.news-medical.net/?id=15220

Hebrew U. Researchers Find Cannabis Can Strengthen Bones
http://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/96146

Peripheral cannabinoid receptor, CB2, regulates bone mass
http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/103/3/696

New Weapon In Battle Against Osteoporosis
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/35621.php

Activation of CB2 receptor attenuates bone loss in osteoporosis
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=210#2

Pain-
Cannabis effective at relieving pain after major surgery
http://www.news-medical.net/?id=17995

Cannabinoids, in combination with (NSAIDS), produce a synergistic analgesic effect
http://www.medjournal.com/forum/sho…587&postcount=1

Cannabinoids Among Most Promising Approaches to Treating Neuropathic Pain,
http://www.redorbit.com/news/health…source=r_health

Cannabinoid analgesia as a potential new therapeutic option
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/16449552

Analgesic and adverse effects of an oral cannabis extract (Cannador) for postoperative pain
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=184

Delta-9-THC based monotherapy in fibromyalgia patients
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=194

Add-on treatment with the synthetic cannabinomimetic nabilone on patients with chronic pain -
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=197

Nabilone significantly reduces spasticity-related pain
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=200

Synergistic affective analgesic interaction between delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and morphine.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=178

Are oral cannabinoids safe and effective in refractory neuropathic pain?
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=143

Dronabinol in the treatment of agitation in patients with Alzheimer’s disease with anorexia
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=61

Cannabis use for chronic non-cancer pain
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=91

Tetrahydrocannabinol for treatment of chronic pain
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=147

Analgesic effect of the cannabinoid analogue nabilone
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=203

The perceived effects of smoked cannabis on patients with multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=13

Pain relief with oral cannabinoids in familial Mediterranean fever.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=18

The effect of orally and rectally administered delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on spasticity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=12

Marihuana as a therapeutic agent for muscle spasm or spasticity.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=53

Analgesic effect of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=16

The analgesic properties of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and codeine.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=17

Most pain patients gain benefit from cannabis in a British study
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…kel.php?id=84#1

Parkinson’s Disease
Marijuana Compounds May Aid Parkinson’s Disease
http://cannabisnews.com/news/19/thread19725.shtml

Marijuana-Like Chemicals Helps Treat Parkinson’s
http://cannabisnews.com/news/22/thread22608.shtml

Cannabis use in Parkinson’s disease: subjective improvement of motor symptoms.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=33

Cannabinoids reduce levodopa-induced dyskinesia in Parkinson’s disease
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=54

Nabilone on L-DOPA induced dyskinesia in patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=153

Evaluation of cannabidiol in dystonic movement disorders.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=14

Beneficial and adverse effects of cannabidiol in a Parkinson patient
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=142

Neuroprotective effect of cannabinoids in a rat model of Parkinson’s disease
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/17196181

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder
IDF TO TREAT SHELL SHOCK WITH CANNABIS
http://www.onlinepot.org/medical/id…sshellshock.htm

Study: Marijuana Eases Traumatic Memories
http://cannabisnews.com/news/13/thread13601.shtml

Medical Marijuana: PTSD Medical Malpractice
http://salem-news.com/articles/june…veque_61407.php

Cannabis for the Wounded – Another Walter Reed Scandal
http://www.libertypost.org/cgi-bin/…=179973&Disp=11

PTSD and Cannabis: A Clinician Ponders Mechanism of Action
http://ccrmg.org/journal/06spr/perspective2.html

Cannabis Eases Post Traumatic Stress
http://ccrmg.org/journal/06spr/ptsd.html

Endocannabinoids extinguish bad memories in the brain
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=123#1

Natural high helps banish bad memories
http://www.newscientist.com/article…d-memories.html

Pregnancy
Oily fish makes ‘babies brainier’
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/4631006.stm

Ganja use among Jamaican women.
http://www.rism.org/isg/dlp/ganja/a…anjaBabyes.html

Dreher’s Jamaican Pregnancy Study
http://www.november.org/stayinfo/br…reherStudy.html

Cannabis Relieves Morning Sickness
http://ccrmg.org/journal/06spr/dreher.html#morning

Prenatal Marijuana Exposure and Neonatal Outcomes in Jamaica
http://www.druglibrary.org/Schaffer…/can-babies.htm

The Endocannabinoid-CB Receptor System
http://www.nel.edu/pdf_/25_12/NEL251204A01_Fride_.pdf

CLAIM #7: MARIJUANA USE DURING PREGNANCY HARMS THE FETUS
http://www.erowid.org/plants/cannab…bis_myth7.shtml

Prenatal exposure
Prenatal Marijuana Exposure and Neonatal Outcomes in Jamaica
http://www.druglibrary.org/Schaffer…/can-babies.htm

The Endocannabinoid-CB Receptor System
http://www.nel.edu/pdf_/25_12/NEL251204A01_Fride_.pdf

Ganja use among Jamaican women.
http://www.rism.org/isg/dlp/ganja/a…anjaBabyes.html

Dreher’s Jamaican Pregnancy Study
http://www.november.org/stayinfo/br…reherStudy.html

Nonmutagenic action of cannabinoids in vitro
http://trophort.com/005/993/005993433.html

Prenatal exposure to tobacco, alcohol, cannabis and caffeine on birth size and subsequent growth.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/e…st_uids=3657756

Tobacco and marijuana use on offspring growth from birth through 3 years of age.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/e…Pubmed_RVDocSum

Prenatal marijuana use and neonatal outcome.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/e…Pubmed_RVDocSum

Pruritis
Cream with endocannabinoids effective in the treatment of pruritus
http://bbsnews.net/article.php/20051211212223236/print

Topical cannabinoid agonists : An effective new possibility for treating chronic pruritus.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=196

Dronabinol in patients with intractable pruritus secondary to cholestatic liver disease.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=116

Sativex
Sativex in the treatment of pain caused by rheumatoid arthritis
http://rheumatology.oxfordjournals….bstract/45/1/50

Sativex produced significant improvements in a subjective measure of spasticity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=170

Sativex in patients suffering from multiple sclerosis
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=168

Sativex in patients suffering from multiple sclerosis associated detrusor overactivity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=168

Sativex showed positive effects in 65 per cent of patients with chronic diseases
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=230#4

Schizophrenia/ Mental disorders
Increased cannabinoid receptor density in the posterior cingulate cortex in schizophrenia.
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/16710682

Symptoms of schizotypy precede cannabis use.
http://www.ukcia.org/forum/read.php?7,7543,7579

Cannabidiol as an antipsychotic
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=171

Anandamide levels in cerebrospinal fluid of first-episode schizophrenic patients
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…of_cannabis_use

Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol-Induced Effects on Psychosis and Cognition
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…s_and_Cognition

Cannabis is a First-Line Treatment for Childhood Mental Disorders
http://www.counterpunch.org/mikuriya07082006.html

Cannabis does not induce schizophrenia,
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/12283.php

Cannabis use does not cause schizophrenia
http://www.health.am/psy/more/canna…_schizophrenia/

Cannabinoids and psychosis.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/e…Pubmed_RVDocSum

Cannabis as a psychotropic medication
http://bjp.rcpsych.org/cgi/content/full/185/1/78

Study Shows Long Term Marijuana Users Healthy
http://www.erowid.org/plants/cannab…_science3.shtml

Cannabis and schizophrenia link blurs further
http://www.newscientist.com/channel…rs-further.html

Evidence does not show a strong causal relation between the use of cannabis and psychosocial harm
http://www.library.nhs.uk/mentalHea…24106&tabID=289

——- Page 9

Sickle Cell Disease
Cannabis Relieves Sickle Cell Disease!
http://www.cannabisculture.com/foru…?Number=1155878

Sickle Cell Disease and Cannabis
http://www.pacifier.com/~alive/cmu/Sickle_cell.htm

Marijuana smoking in young adults with sickle cell
http://caribbean.scielo.org/scielo….&lng=en&nrm=iso

Medical use of cannabis in sickle cell disease
http://www.chanvre-info.ch/info/it/…-in-sickle.html

Cannabis use in sickle cell disease: a questionnaire study.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/e…2&dopt=Abstract

Sleep modulation
Cannabidiol, a constituent of Cannabis sativa, modulates sleep in rats.
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abs…844117?prt=true

Dronabinol reduces signs and symptoms of idiopathic intracranial hypertension
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=181

Cannabis-based medicine in central pain in multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=175

Two cannabis based medicinal extracts for relief of central neuropathic pain
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=15

Functional role for cannabinoids in respiratory stability during sleep
http://www.pacifier.com/~alive/cmu/…sleep_apnea.htm

THC reduces sleep apnoea in animal research
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=120#1

Spasticity
The treatment of spasticity with Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in persons with spinal cord injury.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=166

Cannabis-based medicine in spasticity caused by multiple sclerosis
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=192

Cannabinoids in multiple sclerosis
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=160

Sativex produced significant improvements in a subjective measure of spasticity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=170

Do cannabis-based medicinal extracts have general or specific effects on symptoms in ms?
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=56

Efficacy, safety and tolerability of an oral cannabis extract in the treatment of spasticity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=63

Are oral cannabinoids safe and effective in refractory neuropathic pain?
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=143

Experiences with THC-treatment in children and adolescents
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=80

The treatment of spasticity with D9-THC in patients with spinal cord injury
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=79

The effect of orally and rectally administered delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on spasticity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=12

Nabilone in the treatment of multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=11

Treatment of spasticity in spinal cord injury with dronabinol
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=112

Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol shows antispastic and analgesic effects
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=10

Effect of cannabinoids on spasticity and ataxia in multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=2

Delta-9-THC in the treatment of spasticity associated with multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=1

Effect of Delta-9-THC on EMG Measurements in Human Spasticity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=110

The effect of delta-9-THC on human spasticity.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=154

Cannabis effect on spasticity in spinal cord injury.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=113

Treatment of human spasticity with delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol.
` http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=8

Marihuana as a therapeutic agent for muscle spasm or spasticity.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=53

The perceived effects of marijuana on spinal cord injured males.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=138

Motor effects of delta 9 THC in cerebellar Lurcher mutant mice.
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…her_mutant_mice

Cannabis-based medicine in spasticity caused by multiple sclerosis
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…tiple_sclerosis

Spinal Cord Injury
The treatment of spasticity with Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in persons with spinal cord injury.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=166

Are oral cannabinoids safe and effective in refractory neuropathic pain?
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=143

The treatment of spasticity with D9-THC) in patients with spinal cord injury
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=79

Delta-9-THC as an alternative therapy for overactive bladders in spinal cord injury
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=102

The effect of orally and rectally administered delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on spasticity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=12

Treatment of spasticity in spinal cord injury with dronabinol
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=112

Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol shows antispastic and analgesic effects
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=10

The effect of delta-9-THC on human spasticity.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=154

Cannabis effect on spasticity in spinal cord injury.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=113

Marihuana as a therapeutic agent for muscle spasm or spasticity.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=53

The perceived effects of marijuana on spinal cord injured males.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=138

Stroke
Cannabidiol has a cerebroprotective action
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…iting_mechanism

Delta(9)-THC) prevents cerebral infarction
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…ent_hypothermia

Medical marijuana: study shows that THC slows atherosclerosis
http://thenexthurrah.typepad.com/th…al_marijua.html

Tea as medicine
Cannabis tea revisited: A systematic evaluation
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/e…Pubmed_RVDocSum

THC/tetrahydrocannabinol
THC is effective in the treatment of tics in Tourette syndrome
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=98

THC effective in Tourette-Syndrome
http://www.pacifier.com/~alive/cmu/tourette_thc.htm

THC effective in Tourette syndrome in a 6-week trial
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=146#1

Treatment of Tourette’s Syndrome With Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol
http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/cgi…/full/156/3/495

THC inhibits primary marker of Alzheimer’s disease
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=225#3

THC improves appetite and reverses weight loss in AIDS patients
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=189

Cancer-related anorexia-cachexia syndrome
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…xia_Study_Group

THC effective in appetite and weight loss in severe lung disease (COPD)
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=191#2

The antinociceptive effect of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol in the arthritic rat
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…binoid_receptor

Synergy between Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and morphine in the arthritic rat
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…e_arthritic_rat

Bronchial effects of aerosolized delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=109

Bronchodilator effect of delta1-tetrahydrocannabinol administered by aerosol
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=60

Effects of smoked marijuana in experimentally induced asthma.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=57

Marijuana and oral delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol on specific airway conductance
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=67

New Synthetic Delta-9-THC Inhaler Offers Safe, Rapid Delivery
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/22937.php

Smoked marijuana and oral delta-9-THC on specific airway conductance in asthmatic subjects
http://www.ukcia.org/research/Smoke…InAsthmatic.php

Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=193

9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Inhibits Cell Cycle Progression in Human Breast Cancer
http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/c…ract/66/13/6615

THC and prochlorperazine effective in reducing vomiting in women following breast surgery
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=219#1

{Delta}9-Tetrahydrocannabinol-Induced Apoptosis in Jurkat Leukemia T Cells
http://mcr.aacrjournals.org/cgi/con…bstract/4/8/549

Delta(9)-THC) prevents cerebral infarction
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…ent_hypothermia

Medical marijuana: study shows that THC slows atherosclerosis
http://thenexthurrah.typepad.com/th…al_marijua.html

Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol shows antispastic and analgesic effects
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=10

The effect of delta-9-THC on human spasticity.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=154

The treatment of spasticity with D9-THC) in patients with spinal cord injury
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=79

Delta-9-THC as an alternative therapy for overactive bladders in spinal cord injury
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=102

The effect of orally and rectally administered delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on spasticity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=12

The treatment of spasticity with Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in persons with spinal cord injury.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=166

Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol-Induced Effects on Psychosis and Cognition
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…s_and_Cognition

The effect of orally and rectally administered delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on spasticity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=12

Marihuana as a therapeutic agent for muscle spasm or spasticity.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=53

Analgesic effect of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=16

The analgesic properties of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and codeine.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=17

The perceived effects of smoked cannabis on patients with multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=13

Cannabis use for chronic non-cancer pain
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=91

Tetrahydrocannabinol for treatment of chronic pain
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=147

Delta-9-THC based monotherapy in fibromyalgia patients
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=194

Delta(9)-THC) prevents cerebral infarction
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…ent_hypothermia

Delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol protects hippocampal neurons from excitotoxicity
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…_excitotoxicity

Tobacco vs Cannabis-
Cannabis Smoke and Cancer: Assessing the Risk
http://www.norml.org/index.cfm?Group_ID=6891

Cannabis and tobacco smoke are not equally carcinogenic
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/ar…i?artid=1277837

Smoking Marijuana Does Not Cause Lung Cancer
http://www.mapinc.org/drugnews/v05/n1065/a03.html

Tobacco and marijuana use on offspring growth from birth through 3 years of age.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/e…Pubmed_RVDocSum

Progression from marijuana use to daily smoking and nicotine dependence
http://www.erowid.org/references/refs_view.php?ID=6951

High anxieties – What the WHO doesn’t want you to know about cannabis
http://www.newscientist.com/article…t-cannabis.html

Radioactive tobacco
http://www.cannabisculture.com/news/tobacco/

Tourette’s Syndrome
Treatment of Tourette’s Syndrome With Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol
http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/cgi…/full/156/3/495

THC is effective in the treatment of tics in Tourette syndrome
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=98

Treatment of Tourette’s syndrome with Delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=99

Cannabinoids: possible role in patho-physiology and therapy of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=100

THC effective in Tourette-Syndrome
http://www.pacifier.com/~alive/cmu/tourette_thc.htm

THC effective in Tourette syndrome in a 6-week trial
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=146#1

Vaporizers
Vaporization as a smokeless cannabis delivery system
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=187

Smokeless Cannabis Delivery Device Efficient And Less Toxic
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/71112.php

Volcano is to Vaporizer As Porsche is to Automobile
http://ccrmg.org/journal/04spr/volcano.html

Recommendation to Patients: “Don’t smoke, Vaporize”
http://ccrmg.org/journal/03sum/vaporize.html

Decreased respiratory symptoms in cannabis users who vaporize.
http://marijuana.researchtoday.net/archive/4/4/1195.htm

Use of vaporizers reduces toxins from cannabis smoke
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=146#2

Wilson’s Disease
Cannabis sativa and dystonia secondary to Wilson’s disease.
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/15390041

Severe Epilepsy Seizures Cured by Cannabis Oil Containing CBD Cannabinoids

  • August 28, 2012 9:20 pm

Cannabindiol Crosses the Blood Brain Barrier

  • August 24, 2012 3:27 am

11/08/08
Dr. Courtney speaks on the CANNABIS ISSUES PANEL of experts and authors at the 18th ANNUAL SOUTHERN HUMBOLDT HEMP FEST

Emcee: Jimmy Durchslag:

Next we have William Courtney, DR. BILL COURTNEY, Cannabis Medical Consultant. Many of you… I know he’s based in Mendocino, has an office in Willits, but he’s also here in our area, regularly. He’s my medical consultant. And I know if you’ve e’er seen him, you get a lot of information about cannabis–it’s health effects. So he’s going to talk to us about that. Dr. Bill. Welcome. (applause)

Dr. Bill:

Thank you. I just noticed today that this is the 18th Annual Hemp Fest. Interestingly, the International Cannabinoid Research Society has also had it’s 18th Annual.

And this is the manual that came out of the 18th Annual research [He shows the bound sheaf of papers.] And it’s free online. If you go to [sounds like "Icarus"] ICRS, and go to the symposium page, like you were going to sign up for the symposium, this is a PDF.

And for those who are not able to go online, there are a stack of cd’s over there. You can take this to Staples and for $20 print your own copy.

“Icarus” [ICRS], this year, was phenomenal! It was only overshadowed by my discovery of the United States Patent on CBD and cannabinoids.

But, since there is so much to talk about, I want to focus a little bit on Icarus, first, and then we’ll get into the U. S. Patent.

The thing that came out of this years’ ICRS that was quite amazing is there’s a whole series of acid molecules in the raw plant – the 21 carbon molecules. Those break down with the slightest amount of heat or aging. THC-A, which previously was thought of as a storage molecule, is in fact and active molecule, and when you heat it, you break that carboxy group off to create THC, which is psychoactive. So a lot of our activities over the last 40 years have been aimed at how to improve the thc potency, because we had assumed that the psychoactivity was tantamount to the medicinal aspects.

But as we look at it closer it turns out that there’s an awful lot about the green plant, before it’s been treated culturally, with heat, that has a lot of benefit. And this years’ Icarus introduced a lot of these: cannabidiol acid, cannabichromic acid, cannabigerol acid: all of those 21 carbon molecules have unique medical properties. In particular, CBD-A, or cannabidiol acid, is an antibiotic. As soon as you put it into a tea, you simmer it, you saute it, you bake it, you smoke it, you lose that antibiotic function, and it converts it into CBD; with additional heat it converts into thc; and so with prolonged heating you increase the amount of THC (but our plant currently has a lot of THC, so that really isn’t essential.

My current position, for those of you who I’ve met with clinically, I’m recommending that the greens be part of your diet.

If you look at the world around us you see that the deer eat it; they don’t really eat a lot, but they kind of munch at it. Iguanas eat it. Birds eat it. Rats. Dogs. Cats. Animals understand that.

A few of the leaves allows you access to, not only THC, but the THC-A, these other cannabinoids, all of which are fat molecules, that move into the adipose tissue of your body. And if you eat it regularly for two months, you eventually will become saturated, which is a desirable state in which these various chemicals can be found, and are plentiful, in the fat tissue of the body.

The benefit of them being fat molecules that store in the fat is that it acts like a depo, in the sense that if your body needs a particular supplement, it can draw down from the fat tissue that particular cannabinoid. And these cannabinoids, we now know, provide anti-epileptic, they provide antibiotic, antiviral, antifungal, anti-anxiolitic, anti-psychotic, a tremendous range of medicinal activities.

And there was an article out of last years’ Icarus that talked about the unique ability of body to draw down the specific cannabinoid as it’s needed. So, ideally, if it’s a part of your diet, the way that it is with the rest of the animals who are not enculturated, if you have a minor fungal infection, you’ll pull down an antifungal before it becomes clinical, and you’ll prevent the problem from becoming even noticeable. The same with an anti-psychotic, the same with an anti-anxiolitic (anti-anxiolitic is something that reduces anxiety, cuts anxiety. So, it’s such a wide range of conditions that this plant is capable of contributing to our body’s ability to modulate.

And I think that’s one of the take-home messages of this last Icarus, is that all this plant does is facilitate the body’s ability to take care of itself.

If each person here would take ten hours and review the immune system on the web, go to Wikepedia, look up all the links, learn about the immune system, how anti-inflammatory, auto-immune, how it detects self, not-self, precancerous changes. I mean, the immune system is absolutely amazing. And what cannabis does is facilitate the regulation of the immune system.

The body produces endogenous cannabinoids. You may have heard of endorphins: that’s endogenous morphine. Well, in a similar fashion, the body produces endogenous cannabinoid.

I’m currently submitting an article for publication which would contract that to “encannans”, and the reason that I selected that word is because it removes part of this tone of cannabis, which causes such panic in so many people, and, in order to reach out across the aisle to the Republicans. . . You know you want to not insult them too strongly from the get-go, that first impression is hard to redo. . .

But also part of that article is the history of these molecules. Lipins are the little fat messenger molecules. Those are found in archeia, which is a primitive single-celled organism that was in existence four billion years ago. These little fat molecules would attach to a protein receptor, which we now call a cannabinoid receptor, and the structure of those (they go back and forth through the membrane seven times) that specific structure is still found in the proteins in the membrane of your T cells and D cells (white blood systems in your immune system found in your lymph nodes, spleen, thiamus).

So the entire immunologic system in the human being communicates through the CB2 receptor, which is similar to the same receptor that was first evolved (if evolution is a part of your world view) billions and billions of years ago. So we had this incredibly conserved system (and conservation is when a design is so effective that it doesn’t change over time). Most biological designs evolve over maybe a couple million years, and they turn over and evolve, but this was so effective and so incredible that it has. . . 4 billion years later you can find it in the cells that are involved in fighting cancer, and that are fighting infection.

I may be getting a little bit detailed here, but all to say, if you want to look at this Icarus, and I highly, highly recommend that you do this, send me an email, and I can send you this as a pdf file that you can just look at electronically, or you can take it to Staples, print it out, and for those of us who like to look at a physical copy, you can make notes and go back and forth.

We’re hoping to bring the Second International CB2 Conference to Mendocino. I attended the First International, which was in Banff in May of ’06, and Ive been speaking with Keith Sharkey, who coordinated that. Researchers from all over the world, from Israel, Japan, Germany, United Kingdom, Canada, all convened for three days and we did nothing but exchange information about this 2nd cannabinoid binding receptorthat CB2 receptor we were just talking about–thats in the immune system.

Because medicine is nothing but about enhancing immunology, and immunology is nothing but about detecting self/non-self, thats foreign bodies, protection from cancers, and trying to make a peace in the world where your own cells can decide to defy.

A million times a day, cells begin to divide that shouldn’t be dividing and the immune system has to say, “Hey, you know, the shrubs are getting a little hairy there; we’ve got to trim them down. We’ve got enough renal cells or kidney cells. We’ve got enough bone cells, muscle cells.” So the immune system’s highly competent at dealing with that, but it can become more competent. And that is exactly what cannabinoids do, whether you’re talking about the body’s endogenous cannabinoids, or the plant, which can be phytocannabinoids (which just means cannabinoids from plants) or exogenous cannabinoids. Both of those terms refer to those 20 carbon molecules that are produced outside of the body, but bind to the protein receptors on the cells in our body and therefore help regulate it. So whether we’re talking about the body’s chemistry, or the plant chemistry, their role is to modulate the function of the immune system. And a modulator is a chemical substance that can either increase the activity of the immune system, or decrease it.

And it’s like, medicine always bothered me when I would study traditional pharmaceuticals, and they’d say, “Well, they can give diarrhea or constipation.” Well, that’s great, you know, huh!? Can you choose, or do you just kind of get stuck with what you get stuck with? Well, the same with. . . A modulator is a substance which provides feedback. Every cell in the body has a function: brain cells, nerve cells, blood cells, bone cells, muscle cells. There’s something that they’re supposed to be doing. And it could be overactive. And, if it’s overacting, the body would like to tone it down, slow it down. And the feedback it gets from the cannabinoids say, “Wow, this is too much, we need to slow it down, dial it in.” If the system is insufficiently active, then it wants to speed it up to normal.

So a cannabinoid is a modulator that restores optimal function. That’s what the body’s system is doing. That’s what the plant does. The plant facilitates the rapid restoration of the normal function.

And I focus a lot on the immune system because that’s so central to disease and illness, but it modulates the endocrine system. It modulates the neuromuscular system. It modulates bone remodeling – osteoporosis and osteomalacia. Those are conditions in which there are two cells, one of which burrows through the bone and chews up the old bone, then a new one, the osteoblast comes and lays down new bone, and so the bone is completely rebuilt every seven years. That’s the bone life-cycle, the longest in the body. And these two cells are involved in that constant remodeling. Well, they communicate by cannabinoids. It’s become the “duh!” [laughs] of modern physiology.

Everything uses these very simple fat molecules to provide feedback, and as we age with the loss of some of the female hormones, in particular, that communication falters, and the osteoclasts (that cell that burrows and dissolves the bone) just keeps tunneling away, and the osteoblast just kind of kicks back and gets out of sync and doesn’t lay down new bone, and we perforate, making the bone porous. And so the cannabinoids facilitate that one-to-one communication, restore, (Restore may be a leap. Lots of times I get overzealous in my hopes.) at least will facilitate the communication which will prevent further porosity changes. It will stop the condition from progressing and, if the design is consistent, I actually believe it will increase the density and restore normal density with that communication. Because, if you’re burrowing, and you cross a tunnel, you don’t have to burrow through that tunnel because it’s missing, but the new one will come through and lay down new bone.

So, I’m going to stick with my thing. I think it will actually improve the condition. So, bone-remodeling, cancers, inflammatory conditions, prostate cancer, growth regulation, metastasis, all that, can be found in this free book on the web. Consider this the most gracious gift of the web to people who have an interest in health. And, like I said, just send me your email, I’ll send you an electronic copy that you can peruse.

And, we hopefully will review this before the 2nd Cannabinoid Conference. I’ll try to do a one to two or three day review of the language, and we’ll go from the terms, the definitions; we’ll look at a little bit of chemistry, then we’ll look at a little bit of microbiology (which is a big love of mine) and how biochemistry is involved in the functions of the cell: all that to kind of prepare us for this group of visiting dignitaries which, you know, will tell us where the dream is today.

Something that is incredibly overwhelming is the discovery of Patent 6,630,507B1. The United States of America has been assigned the patent rights to cannabinoids as antioxidants and neuroprotectants.

Over on the table there is a face sheet, these are free hand-outs. You go home. You type in USPTO (which is US Patent and Trademark Office) and google, it will take you to their site. Search by patent number. Just type that patent number in. It’ll bring you up the electronic copy of this patent (for those of you can do that), for those who can’t, there are hard copies over there and if you want to make a donation for print and paper you can. But these are primarily for people who don’t have access to the web, and are not into electronic copies. This should be read probably a minimum of ten times, and then committed to memory. It really is absolutely phenomenal. It reminded me of more organic chemistry than I ever knew. Whenever you write a patent, you hire a very expensive attorney, who really is an English literature graduate doctoral person, and there are some patent attorneys who aren’t like that, but in general their skill is in being very articulate.

And this talks about the chemistry of, particularly, cannabidiol. On two separate occasions the government lists cannabidiol on separate line item claims. It spells out the conditions for which cbd is uniquely beneficial – the oxidated stress diseases–and that includes everything from diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, the neo-plasias, coronary vascular disease.

In particular they isolate the neuro conditions.

CBD can cross the blood-brain barrier. So, it’s a fat molecule that can get into the brain, which is very hard to do, because the brain is very protective, but because this has 34 million years of research on its side it knows how to walk between the lines and the body has allowed it access to the brain. So, for Parkinsons, for Alzheimers, for strokes whether embowelic, hemmorhagic, or traumatic, or surgical, these are all conditions where CBD is uniquely beneficial.

For the first time ever in three years of looking, this has human dosage schedules. This is of phenomenal importance to you legally. It tells out what you are entitled to do, and then you just look at the plant, and the plant tells you how much plant material you need to generate that.

Speeding quickly forward through many other things, part of what I talk to all my patients about is the ability to fractionate for cbd, which means. . . There’s a piece of paper over there which tells you the technique. That’s another thing to read and memorize, because it’s the single most important thing for your health, and for your legal safety.

You take fine grind cannabis.

At my office there’s this $400 thermometer, which is supposed to be very accurate. You get a variable temperature heat gun, which allows you to provide a constant single temperature for hours at a time, so that it’s better than any of the vaporizers, because it’s very, very, very steady. So you come in here. You turn the heat on until it goes to 166 degrees Centigrade. Take the file; mark that place on your heat gun, so you can get back to that.

Take your cannabis. You grind the cannabis to a fine degree which increases the surface area so that you can get to the cannabinoids in the plant material.

Put the heat to it. The longer you heat it the more THC is boiled.

We’ve now gotten down to the physics of the cannabinoids. The vaporization temperature is a temperature at which a liquid goes through a phase change to a gas. Like with water, at a 100 degrees Centigrade water begins to boil. You’ll never get water at 101 degrees because it turns into a vapor before it can get that hot.

THC boils at 157 degrees, that’s Delta 9. Delta 8 boils at a 175. Cannabidiol at 188. So if you have a very specific temperature, you can heat the cannabis and vaporize the THC. If you want THC, you go ahead and use that, or do whatever you can do with that, but there’s so much of it there that for most people, we need to lower the THC content so you can get to the CBD.

So once you’ve heated it you’ve stripped the THC out of it. You now have cannabidiol plant material. That CBD plant material is nonpsychoactive, and it’ll allow you to begin to get to the dosage schedule that this patent recommends.

For the last year I’ve been recommending 5 milligrams per kilogram body weight. That is an amount of cannabidiol that it takes for this particular mouse strain to block the development of diabetes.

Now, I’ve been hanging my hat on that for a year, but I now have 5,000 pegs to hang my hat on, thanks to the United States government patent. Because. . . They talk about higher doses. They talk about 10 milligrams per kilogram body weight. They talk about 20 and 40. Huge. Hugely important!

But if you just stick with the 5 mg/kg, that still requires you to process a lot of plant material, because the amount of cbd is so low. There is a strain called “White Russian”, which is 100% more CBD, and there’s some new strains coming out of Mendocino which could have up to 700% more CBD. These strains will make it a lot easier to get access to the 500 mg a day, which is the schedule that I’ve been recommending to my patients.

That’s the same amount that you would use of vitamin C, and at that level, in this particular mouse strain, you block the development of diabetes 60% of the time. There’s a particular mouse strain that 86% of these mice develop diabetes. The pharmaceutical industry tests all oral and injectable medications on this mouse strain because it’s such a reliable model for diabetes, so, you know, does glucophage inhibit diabetes? Does insulin/hemulin? It’s an amazing animal model for diabetes.

If you give that animal model which 86% of the time will develop diabetes, if you give them 5 mg/kg body weight, 60% of them do not go on to develop diabetes. It completely blocks the. . .[audience applause]

Yeah, 14 million Americans go blind with diabetes a year! Kidney renal failure. I’ve got patients I see in their homes who are on dialysis, people who’s knees have been cut off, people who’s vision fails because of diabetic retinopathy.

And, we could prevent that with something that’s non psychoactive, and that’s just an amazing molecule, as is thoroughly detailed in this patent. Which is why every person here needs to just know this thing inside and out. And it will take you a while. I mean, I’m still studying it and every time I read it there’s more stuff there. It really is phenomenal.

I have a room upstairs at 4:20, and any specific questions on either fractionating for cannabinoids (and pick up that sheet and study that–key to your legal and central to your physical health). . . There’s one over there on green leaf.

Did we talk about green leaf yet?

So if you talk about those molecules that are present in the fresh green leaf, I try to use 8 leaves a day. I juice it with carrots. I started out with carrots – I do four in the morning, four in the afternoon, but after eating carrot juice for five or six months you begin to turn orange a little bit (I knew someone in college who actually did), and so I now put in beets and broccoli (just because Bush doesn’t like it, it figures it’s got to be good for you), anything laying around – kales. It makes a drink.

And it’s phenomenal because you get these cannabinoids in, they’re non-psychoactive, they saturate the body and they facilitate the body’s regulation. And so, I tell each of my patients: the single most important thing you put in your mouth after water, on a daily basis, is, approximately, eight green leaves a day.

That number is unknown, but I’ve had 90 year old people who have gotten out of their wheelchairs who’ve had arthritis that was so inflammatory and painful. . . By down-regulating the inflammatory system you decrease the swelling and inflammation, you increase mobility and articulate function. Its prevention of alzheimers, of coronary vascular disease. Prophylactic uses.

Prophylactic uses are the most pivotal in this document. I don’t know how they’ll stand up in court but I plan on using them very soon, like November 6th Im going to be in court presenting this information on this prophylactic use. That’s until they take my license away. But then I’ll keep doing it, so…

If you have any questions, talk to me later upstairs, and I’ll answer them if I’m able. [audience applause]

emcee Jimmy:

Dr. Courtney! Thank you, Bill. Obviously a wealth of information there. He has his very attractive banner up here. Is that drcourtney@mcn.org? yes, if you want a copy of the Icarus document which he has offered on line. His card is there. There’re a couple books here that he’s involved with, and he’ll be upstairs after this panel to answer questions and give more information.

The workshop room is up in that corner. 4:20, he said. I don’t know how that time got chosen, probably just randomly. So, thank you for that.

 

 

 

Source:http://www.civilliberties.org/courtney.html

Cancer & Fungus or Why Cannabis’ anti-fungal properties may be working on Cancers.

  • April 19, 2012 7:14 pm

Cancer is a fungus, can be caused by a fungus, or is accompanied by
late-stage fungal infections, and now the Mayo Clinic confirms this. They
are not the first to say so though. Many, even from the official world of
orthodox oncology, recognize the similarities of cancer and fungal
infections, the decay that ties these two together in a dance that all too
often ends in miserable death.

The Mayo Clinic[1] is saying that a fungal infection of the
gastrointestinal tract mimics cancer and inflammatory bowel disease. The
invasive fungus, Basidiobolus ranarum, is typically found in the soil,
decaying organic matter and the gastrointestinal tracts of fish, reptiles,
amphibians, and bats.

Patients with this fungal infection had non-specific symptoms such as
abdominal pain or a mass that could be felt on examination. Before a
conclusive diagnosis of the fungal infection was made, most patients were
thought to have abdominal cancer, inflammatory bowel disease or
diverticulitis. Surgical resection of the area of involvement and
prolonged antifungal therapy successfully treated most patients.

Interestingly, a few years ago researchers at Johns Hopkins were surprised
that the drug itraconazole, commonly used to treat toenail fungus, can
also block angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels commonly seen in
cancers. Tumor angiogenesis is the proliferation of a network of blood
vessels that penetrates into cancerous growths, supplying nutrients and
oxygen and removing waste products.[2] Cancer researchers studying the
conditions necessary for cancer metastasis have discovered that
angiogenesis is one of the critical events required for metasteses to
occur.[3]In mice induced to have excess blood vessel growth, treatment
with itraconazole reduced blood vessel growth by 67% compared to placebo.
“We were surprised, to say the least, that itraconazole popped up as a
potential blocker of angiogenesis,” says Dr. Jun O. Liu, professor of
pharmacology. “We couldn’t have predicted that an antifungal drug would
have such a role.” Itraconazole was found to reduce the numbers of
circulating cancer cells, prevent the worsening of prostate cancers, and
delay the need for chemotherapy. However, it has serious side effects when
given in the necessary high dosages that include hypertension, low
potassium levels and fluid retention. These side effects require treatment
with other medications. Effects of high doses of itraconazole could lead
to heart failure.[4]

For two decades John Hopkins has recognized the increasing frequency of
severe fungal infections in patients with neoplastic diseases. Most fungal
infections are caused by the commonly recognized opportunistic fungi
Candida spp and Aspergillus spp, and the pathogenic fungi Cryptococcus
neoformans, Histoplasma capsulatum, Coccidiodes immitis, and less often by
Blastomyces dermatidis. However, recently newer pathogens such as
Pheohyphomycetes, Hyalohyphomycetes, Zygomycetes and other fungi of
emerging importance such as Torulopsis glabrata, Trichosporon beigelii,
Malassezia spp, Saccharomyces spp, Hansenula spp, Rhodotorula spp, and
Geotrichum candidum have appeared as significant causes of infection in
this patient population.

Dr. Tullio Simoncini does not say that cancer is caused by yeast; what he
is telling the world is that the cancer is a yeast overgrowth. What causes
the cancer (or a yeast-filled tumor) is another thing. Simoncini has
always insisted that tumors are white because they are fungi. Some have
made fun of him, but looking around at the extremely sparse information
about the subject, I ran into one person saying:

If someone had asked me a year ago what color the inside of a tumor was, I
would have guessed red and gray. When they did the biopsy, I asked to see
the tissue specimens: five quarter-inch to half-inch strings of vermicelli
(Italian for little worms) with little streakings of blood. They didn’t
look evil to me, just strings of fat. The entire mass was white inside as
the pathology report stated.

Specialists in throat and mouth cancer say that cancers can be red or
white patches: any patch that appears randomly and is red or white in
color could be a mouth cancer symptom. The white patches in the mouth are
called leukoplakia and the red patches are called erythroplakia, which
are pre-cancerous conditions. Though these red or white patches are not
always cancerous, it could be the result of a fungal infection caused by
Candida called thrush.[5] Thrush will lead to a red patch that often
bleeds after the white patch disappears. A small amount of this fungus
lives in your mouth most of the time. It is usually kept in check by your
immune system and other types of germs that also normally live in your
mouth. However, when your immune system is weak, the fungus can grow.

Fungal Mycotoxins

It just so happens that a toxin produced by mold on nuts and grains can
cause liver cancer, according to University of California Irvine
Researchers. And a French case-control study of 1,010 breast cancer cases
and 1,950 controls with nonmalignant diseases found that breast cancer was
associated with increased frequency of mold-fermented cheese
consumption.[6] Fungi produce mycotoxins, which can kill us or cause
cancer.

Dr. Wang and Groopman from the Environmental Health Sciences Department at
Johns Hopkins published on the effects of mold toxins on DNA in Mutation
Research, a leading cancer journal.[7] They said mycotoxins with
carcinogenic potency include aflatoxins, sterigmatocystin, ochratoxin,
fumonisins, zearalenone, and some Penicillium toxins. Most of these
carcinogenic mycotoxins are genotoxic agents. Aflatoxin is a potent
genotoxic agent, is mutagenic in many model systems and produces
chromosomal aberrations, micronuclei, sister chromatid exchange,
unscheduled DNA synthesis, and chromosomal strand breaks. Most strikingly,
the relationship between aflatoxin exposure and development of human
hepatocellular carcinoma (liver cancer) is demonstrated by studies.

Harrison et al. (1993) examined human breast cancer tissue for evidence of
the presence of aflatoxin. The researchers examined human DNA from a
variety of tissues and organs to identify and quantify aflatoxin
DNA-adducts. Such adducts are considered to be proof of the mycotoxin’s
presence in a particular tissue. Aflatoxins may in fact be a risk factor
for cancer induction in a variety of organs in man, in the same manner as
that of cigarette smoking. [8]

DNA from normal and tumorous tissue obtained from patients with cancer of
the breast was examined. Tumor tissues had higher aflatoxin-adduct levels
than did normal tissue from the same individual. The result of this study
verifies the presence of carcinogenic aflatoxin within the cancer tissue
and thus implicates aflatoxin as a cause of breast cancer. That is the
same as saying cancer is a fungus or is caused by a fungus and this is
what Dr. Simoncini has been saying all along.

Intensive Care Units are particularly on alert with immunocompromised and
oncology patients for fungal infections. “Patients with brain tumors used
to have a life expectancy of 3-12 months, but better treatment has allowed
them to live a bit longer,” said Brenda Shelton, clinical nurse specialist
at the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins
University, Baltimore. “The last two brain tumor ICU patients we treated
died of infection, not of their disease. One patient had a rare fungus,
and the other had candidemia. Years ago, you would not see most of these
fungal infections in patients with brain tumors because they would not
live long enough.”

“The biggest misconception is the belief that fungal infections are rare,”
Shelton said. “Another misconception is fungal infections are like every
other severe infection. They are harder to manage, harder to eradicate and
more frequent than people realize.” One of the most common complications
involved in treating patients with hematologic cancer is fungal
infections.

Aspergillus niger fungal infection in human lungs produces large amounts
of oxalic acid, which is extremely toxic to the blood vessels and which
may cause fatal pulmonary hemorrhages. Consequently, oxalic acid (calcium
oxalate crystals) in the sputum or lung specimens of patients is also an
indication of an Aspergillus infection of the lung. These calcium oxalate
crystals are the same as the calcium oxalate found in breast cancers. The
presence of oxalates in the breast is indicative of the presence of fungi
interwoven within the stages of breast cancer development. Since humans do
not make oxalic acid themselves, this is an appropriate conclusion.[9]

Dr. Robert Young states, “Bacteria, yeast/fungi, and mold are not the
cause of a cancerous condition but are the result and the evidence of
cells and tissues biologically transforming from a healthy state and to an
unhealthy state.” Dr. Young astutely observed that, “over-acidification of
the body leads to the development of chronic yeast and fungal infections
and ultimately a cancerous condition of the cells and tissues.”

If one has cancer, chances are pretty good that one
also has a fungal infection to one degree or another.

According to The Home Medical Encyclopedia, in 1963 about one-half of all
Americans suffered from an “unrecognized” systemic fungal condition. Far
more Americans suffer from fungal infections today as antibiotics, hormone
replacement therapies, and birth control pills continue to be consumed
like candy. Thus more and more children are becoming infected with
candidal meningitis or viral meningitis, which means their systems are
suffering under the weight of fungi who put out an assortment of
poisons—or mycotoxins.

Sodium Bicarbonate is an Antifungal Agent

The current controversy over sodium bicarbonate and its use in oncology
might be relatively new but baking soda has a long history of helping
people get through the worst medical conditions. The Eloquent Peasant, an
Egyptian literary work dated around 2000 B.C., refers to a peddler selling
natron, a natural blend of sodium bicarbonate, chloride and sodium
carbonate used in mummification, just one of hundreds of uses this
compound has been put to. Baking soda’s first widespread use was probably
as a leavening agent for bread and other baked goods. It has been used
commercially since 1775, although the now-famous Arm & Hammer brand wasn’t
introduced until 1867.[10]

Sodium bicarbonate (Na2HCO3) is recognized by most as ordinary baking
soda, which is found in deposits around the globe. Its backbone
characteristic is to maintain balance of carbon dioxide, bicarbonate and
pH. Sodium bicarbonate is available and sold in every supermarket and
pharmacy in the world and is widely used in emergency rooms and intensive
care wards in injectable forms but is sold as a common household substance
that is used for hundreds of different things.

Read my book, Sodium Bicarbonate, and see that something as inexpensive as
baking soda will outperform the most expensive pharmaceuticals. Across a
wide range of disorders, including cancer and diabetes, we find conclusive
evidence and plenty of theoretical backing to suggest that sodium
bicarbonate is a frontline universal medicine that should be employed by
all practitioners of the healing and medical arts for a broad range of
disorders that are afflicting contemporary man.

Dr. Mark Allan Sircus, Ac., OMD, DM (P)
Director International Medical Veritas Association
Doctor of Oriental and Pastoral Medicine
http://publications.imva.info
http://blog.imva.info

Chronic Migraine Headache treated with Cannabis

  • February 24, 2012 11:51 pm

Five cases successfully treated with Marinol and/or illicit cannabis.

Tod H. Mikuriya, M.D.


Case 1

A thirty eight year old white female stock broker supervisor with a twenty-six year history of unilateral vascular headaches escalating to generalized headache with tension headache overlay. The severity and frequency of episodes responded only to parenteral dihydroergotamine, meperidine, and trimethobenzamide HCl with sedation and further immobilization.

Marinol (delta 1-9 tetrahydrocannabinol dissolved in sesame oil) was begun with gradual upward titration dropwise to avoid undesirable mental side effects. She experienced a significant decrease in the frequency of attacks except when she ran out of medication.

She tolerated 40 mg daily (10 mg QID) without side effects but experienced an attack after running out of the THC capsules. Because of financial straits secondary to her disability status and the high expense of Marinol she has partially substituted illicitly obtained marijuana which she has ingested orally with similar relief.

Over the past four years she has maintained better control over the attacks with only one trip to the emergency room for a meperidine treatment in the past two years. She continues to utilize illicit cannabis because of the high cost of Marinol but has difficulty with irregular dosage with either too little or too much.

Case 2

Her mother, a 58 year old hospital ward clerk who has experienced migraine headaches with similar symptoms but less profoundly debilitating than those of her daughter.Likewise, she was treated with a gradually increasing dosageof Marinol with stabilization at a 10 mg daily dose (5 mg BID).Notwithstanding her undergoing stressful conditions on the job she experienced successful stopping of episodes in prodromal stage.

Left neck numbness, anorexia, water retention and left diplopia were reversed with normalization of gastric motility, diuresis,and peripheral vasodilation. She subjectively felt a relief of affectual pressure. She experienced no debilitating side effects as with other antimigraine agents and sedatives. Perceptually she described a “shift of vision”- slightly out of focus. This effect was transient.

Case 3

A 44 year old female teacher has a thirty year history of familial unilateral severe vascular headaches with antecedent visual scotomata. She switched to self-medication with marijuana after 9 years of

meperidine/sedative treatments with their impairing effects.

Cases 4 & 5

She taught her daughters ages 21 and 17 to self-medicate with marijuana with similar success in aborting migraine headaches in the prodromal phase with scotomata.

Discussion

While hemp drugs (cannabis) were introduced to western medicine by O’Shaughnessy in 1839 and attained wide usage until the turn of the century with the development of synthetic and semisynthetic analgesics.Their use declined though maintaining mention in medical texts until removal from the formulary in 1940. Reclassified as a schedule I drug in 1970 alleged to having no medicinal redeeming importance, the synthetic THC created by government sponsored research contractors was downscheduled to II in 1986, the same as non-combination opiates requiring triplicate prescription.

Grinspoon has recently described use of cannabinoids therapeutically for migraine.

It would appear that further clinical trial of both Marinol and cannabis for the treatment of migraine headache would be desirable.

References

Fishbein, M Queries and Minor Notes: Migraine Associated With Menstruation JAMA Vol 120:4 Sept 26, 1942 p 326

Grinspoon L and Baklar Marijuana Forbidden Medicine

Mackenzie, S. Indian hemp in persistent headache. JAMA 1887 9:732.

O’Shaughnessy, W.B.: On the preparations of the Indian Hemp or gunjah; their effects on the animal system in health and their utility in the treatment of tetanus and other convulsive diseases. Trans. Med. and Phys. Soc., Bengal, 1838-40; 71-102, 421-461.

Osler, W., and McCrae: Principles and Practice of Medicine. 8th ed., D. Appleton & Co., New York, 1916, p. 1809

Reynolds JR On Some Therapeutical Uses of Indian Hemp. Arch Med London 1859 Vol 2 154 – 160

Reynolds, JR: Therapeutical uses and toxic effects of cannabis indica. Lancet 1890 1; March 22: 637-638

Solis-Cohen, S. and Githens, T.S.: Pharmacotherapeutics, Materia Medica and Drug Action. D. Appleton and Co. New York, 1928.

Volfe, Z, Dvilansky, A, Nathan, I, Cannabinoids block release of serotonin from platelets induced by plasma from migraine patients. Int. J Clin Pharmacol. Res, 1985; 5(4): 243-6

 

Source: http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer/hemp/migrn2.htm

Marijuana Ingredients Show Promise In Battling Superbugs

  • February 24, 2012 7:55 pm

Substances in marijuana show promise for fighting deadly drug-resistant bacterial infections, including so-called “superbugs,” without causing the drug’s mood-altering effects, scientists in Italy and the United Kingdom are reporting. Besides serving as infection-fighting drugs, the substances also could provide a more environmentally-friendly alternative to synthetic antibacterial substances now widely used in personal care items, including soaps and cosmetics, they say. Their study is scheduled for the Sept. 26 issue of ACS’ monthly Journal of Natural Products.

In the new study, Giovanni Appendino and colleagues point out that scientists have known for years that marijuana contains antibacterial substances. However, little research has been done on those ingredients, including studies on their ability to fight antibiotic resistant infections, the scientists say.

To close that gap, researchers tested five major marijuana ingredients termed cannabinoids on different strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a “superbug” increasingly resistant to antibiotics. All five substances showed potent germ-killing activity against these drug-resistant strains, as did some synthetic non-natural cannabinoids, they say. The scientists also showed that these substances appear to kill bacteria by different mechanisms than conventional antibiotics, making them more likely to avoid bacterial resistance, the scientists note. At least two of the substances have no known mood-altering effects, suggesting that they could be developed into marijuana-based drugs without causing a “high.” – MTS

 

Source: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/120477.php

Cannabis Oil Dosage Instructions

  • November 23, 2011 9:48 pm
  1. Begin your dosing about 2 hours before you normally go to sleep.  The oil takes an hour-and-a-half to 2 hours after ingesting it.  This way, if you get too relaxed, you can just sleep and all is well … it won’t affect your day that way.  Take note of how it makes you feel.
  2.  Squeeze a tiny drop onto a cracker, nut, or whatever … the drop should be about the size of a pinhead.  Most likely you will not feel a dose this small, but it’s better safe than sorry.
  3. If you felt relaxed, but it was manageable last night, then stay at that dose for the next 3 days.  Take that dose 4 times each day to build blood levels and tolerance.
  4.  If you felt nothing, then the next morning double that dose and see how that feels.  What you want is to take enough to feel relaxed or tired, but not enough to feel nauseous, make the room spin, or feel like vomiting.  And sometimes that can be a VERY fine line, so hence the need to go small.
  5. When you find that relaxed dose, stay with that dose for 3 days, 4 times a day.
  6. At the end of the 3 days (or sooner, if you think you can handle it, cuz the quicker the better), double that dose.  Again, I recommend that when you do your increases, do them just like you did your very first dose … at bedtime.
  7. You will continue this until you have built up to 4 quarter gram doses each day.  If the oil affects your daily activities too much, you may want to make your daytime doses a bit lighter and your nighttime doses a bit heavier just so that you will still be getting your gram a day at least.
  8. You may find you dislike the taste of the oil and, at larger doses it can get kind of gross if you don’t like it.  I highly recommend you invest in a digital postal scale, that measures down to 1/100th of a gram, and some Now brand #3 empty veggie capsules.  This way, you can open the cap, put the longer end on the scale and zeroize it.  Then squeeze in your oil and weigh it.  Now you can dial your dose in to perfection.  With the Now brand #3s, you can measure 1/4 gram easily.  You just fill it to almost, but not quite, full.  Once you attain that 1/4 gram dose, you can eyeball your capsules from there on out, but you will need that scale while you are building up.
  9. Here are some links you might find helpful if you wish to purchase these items online:

 

http://www.americanweigh.com/index.php?cPath=24&osCsid=mocsrlnlan1p7bhe4kusuebcu6

(For the scales)

http://www.iherb.com/Now-Foods-3-Gelatin-Caps-Extra-Small-Size-1000-Empty-Capsules/889?at=0

(For the capsules)

10. If you ever find the oil to stiff to readily squeeze out of the syringe, just heat a small cup of water in the microwave for about 1 minute.  With the cap ON the syringe, let the syringe sit in the hot water for 30 seconds.  This should soften the oil enough for the weakest hands.  Just be sure when you’re done filling the capsule, to pull back on the plunger to avoid the oil continuing to come out, causing both waste and a big mess.

You may find it convenient to premeasure several days worth at one time.  And if you need to travel with them, just pre-fill the caps and put them in with your other meds.  I put them in my carry-on with all my supplements and no one has ever been the wiser.  But if you’re really paranoid, you can put them in with a bottle of, say, Manitoba Hemp Oil caps because they’re the same color and will camouflage them perfectly especially if you put them in the bottom of the bottle.

HAPPY HEALING and be sure to let us know any changes, symptom relief, or improvements in condition so we can keep track of the ways this oil is, and isn’t, helpful.

Large clinical trials demonstrate the benefit of the cannabis extract Sativex in patients with multiple sclerosis

  • November 6, 2011 5:46 pm

Full results from three phase III studies with Sativex with
altogether 1,500 MS patients were presented at the ECTRIMS congress
in Amsterdam from 19 – 22 October. These studies provide evidence of
the long term efficacy of this cannabis extract (2.7 mg THC and 2.5
mg CBD per puff) in symptom improvement in patients with moderate to
severe spasticity due to multiple sclerosis who have not responded
adequately to other anti-spasticity medication. These data have led
to the approval of Sativex in the UK, Spain, Denmark, Germany and the
Czech Republic.

Professor Hans Peter Hartung, director of the Clinic of Neurology at
the University of Dusseldorf, Germany, and chairman of a symposium
during the ECTRIMS meeting, commented: “Sativex has proven to reduce
the severity of symptoms and improve patients´ quality of life and
functional status, in patients with spasticity in multiple sclerosis,
meaning that they can undertake everyday tasks more easily. Also,
importantly, clinical experience to date has demonstrated that the
tolerability profile of this medicine is favourable, with limited
relevant adverse effects and – particularly reassuring – the drug
does not appear to lead to withdrawal effects if patients suddenly
stop using it.”

(Source: Press release by GW Pharmaceuticals of 24 October 2011)

Cannabis provides additional pain relief in patients already treated with opioids

  • November 6, 2011 5:42 pm

A clinical study was conducted at the San Francisco General Hospital,
USA, to investigate the effects of inhaled cannabis on 21 patients
with chronic pain, on a regimen of twice-daily doses of morphine or
oxycodone. Participants were admitted to hospital for 5 days. They
were asked to inhale vaporized cannabis in the evening of day 1,
three times a day on days 2-4, and in the morning of day 5. They
inhaled 0.9 grams of cannabis (3.56 per cent THC) with a Volcano
vaporizer of the company Storz & Bickel. Blood sampling was performed
at 12-h intervals on days 1 to 5. The extent of chronic pain was also
assessed daily.

Pharmacokinetic investigations revealed no significant changes in
blood concentrations of morphine or oxycodone after administration of
cannabis. Pain was significantly decreased by an average of 27 per
cent by cannabis inhalation. On a pain scale from 0 to 100 average
pain intensity was 39.6 at baseline and 29.1 on day 5. Researchers
concluded “that vaporized cannabis augments the analgesic effects of
opioids without significantly altering plasma opioid levels. The
combination may allow for opioid treatment at lower doses with fewer
side effects.”

(Source: Abrams DI, Couey P, Shade SB, Kelly ME, Benowitz NL.
Cannabinoid-Opioid Interaction in Chronic Pain. Clin Pharmacol Ther.
2011 Nov 2. [in press])

How to make Cannabis Tinctures

  • November 4, 2011 12:48 am

To make Tincture
Cold Method (recommended) With low Proof Alcohol

Here is the recipe for highest quality tincture. This method does not use heat so keeps the integrity of the cannabinoids intact. From WAMM [with a couple of notes from us]:

Fill jar ¾ full of herb
Fill rest of jar with alcohol; leave some room at top, stir.
Shake jar [vigorously] one or two times a day for 2 weeks [or leave it until there is no green color left in the plant matter]
Strain through metal tea strainer or silkscreen.

You can use whatever kind of clean glass, not plastic, jar you have with a tight lid. One-quart mason jars are ideal. Grind the herb thoroughly in a blender. It should be well ground but doesn’t have to be a powder. You can use leaf, bud, shake, joint leftover, or stems. Too many stems will wreck your blender and a weaker tincture. Leaf work fine but for higher potency use shake or bud. Fill the jar ¾ full of herb; it does not have to be exact. You can use anywhere from ½ to 2/3 part herb but ¾ will make a full strength tincture. Use the highest proof alcohol you can, Everclear, which is 180 proof, but hard to find. So just use the highest proof Vodka you can find. Pour alcohol over the herb, filling the rest of the jar. Leave just enough space (an inch or so) at the top so that you will be able to shake the jar. Stir the mixture; the herb will absorb some of the alcohol so you may need to add more. Put the lid on tightly; label the contents and the date you started. It takes two weeks for the alcohol to extract all the active elements from the herb. Shake the jar once or twice a day for 2 weeks. The alcohol will rise to the top and a deep green/red color will develop. After 2 weeks of aging you can strain the tincture through a metal tea strainer or a silk screen into a small tincture bottle with a dropper. You can leave the rest in the jar if you want, it will age and mellow in flavor and you can strain off as much as you want at a time. Alcohol is a strong preservative it will hold for a long time, be careful when handling the tincture, it satins and will turn everything it comes in contact with green. Use Ultra Palmolive anti-bacterial dish soap, the orange kind, to clean the glass, metal or other ceramic utensils, (do not use plastic) sinks and counter tops works best at dissolving THC residue.

Dosage varies per individual but start with half a dropper dissolved in hot tea or water. Hot tea will dissipate some of the alcohol and activate the THC a bit. It can be taken straight but may burn the tongue and has a very strong herbal taste. [If you cut it with equal parts water, you can hold the dosage under the tongue without burning. Takes effect in seconds.]
Hot Method

Go here for the recipe: Green Dragon

Here are some notes on the Green Dragon method:

Process details—references and rationalizations (Source)

1. Chop the cannabis—more surface area gives means a faster and more efficient extraction. [You can literally chop it into a powder.]

2. Bake the cannabis (decarboxylate).
In whole-plant cannabis, THC content is expressed as THCA (tetrahydrocannabolic acid) prior to decarboxylation into THC, which takes place when cannabis is heated during cooking, and smoked or vaporized ingestion. THCA is a mild analgesic and anti-inflammatory but does not have good affinity with our CB1 receptors, so in order to make a THC-rich tincture that has many of the same therapeutic effects as smoked ingestion (including rapid absorption, quick relief and ease of self-titration), we must convert the THCA in the plant matter into THC prior to extracting it through an alcohol soak. (from Vancouver Island Compassion Society)
THC vaporizes at about 380°F. We want to heat the cannabis to convert THCA to THC, but keep the temperature under 380°F. That is why 325°F is used. Between four and five minutes your oven (and house) will start to smell very strong. This the time to remove the cannabis from the oven.

Notice also that there is considerable misinformation regarding heating the cannabis. It is true that you don’t have to heat it to extract both THC and THCA, but the amount of THC in whole plant preparations is relatively small compared to after decarboxylation of the THCA. So if you want to maximize the strength of your tincture you must heat the cannabis prior to extraction.

3. Use the highest proof alcohol available. In my area this was Bacardi 151. The more alcohol the more efficient the extraction will be.

4. Simmer the mixture.
This is one of the areas that seems to be most debated. Many recipes call for placing the cannabis (unbaked of course) into the alcohol and waiting 2 – 6 weeks. The main concern with heating the alcohol is that it is “explosive” (not exactly true…it is however flammable).

The purpose of the simmering is to heat the alcohol mixture to improve extraction rates and efficiencies. Heating during extraction increases the motion of the molecules (basic physics/chemistry) and drastically decreases extraction times. The boiling point of pure ethanol is 173°F (78°C). We will use the water bath to heat the rum/cannabis mixture to just below the boiling point of ethanol.

Heating the alcohol mixture can be done very safely using a hot water bath. You will need an accurate candy or quick read thermometer. Place about 1 inch of water in a wide, vertical-edged pan (9” wide x 3” high). Bring the water to a low simmer. The rum/cannabis mixture should be in a small (1 pint) mason jar. Do NOT cover the jar.

Put the thermometer into the mason jar and place into the simmering water bath. Bring the temperature of the rum/cannabis mixture to about 165°F (I maintain it between 150°F and 165°F). You want the alcohol mixture to be just barely moving (not boiling, but showing active convection within the mixture). If the mixture starts to bubble too much, just turn down the water bath.

You should have the oven fan on high. You will notice that any alcohol fumes are mixed with water vapor from the water bath and vented out the fan. This combined with the fact that you are trying not to boil the ethanol makes the process quite safe.

5. Strain, titrate, and store.
When you are finished with the extraction you will be left with about 1oz of green dragon tincture. Note that one ounce of the alcohol has evaporated.

Now you should test your eyedropper. In my test 34 full droppers equaled one ounce of liquid (this is a little less than one gram of liquid per dropperful as 29g equals 1ounce).

The liquid should be dark green and smell like cannabis. 1/8oz of good cannabis yields about 30-34 doses of tincture.